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#8 Toyota Gazoo Racing Toyota GR010 - Hybrid: Sebastien Buemi, Kazuki Nakajima, Brendon Hartley
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WEC Spa-Francorchamps
Special feature

The philosophical problems the WEC's new Hypercar class is already facing

OPINION: Most of the column inches after the World Endurance Championship's opener were centred around the relative pace of the Hypercar class and the LMP2s, but there's another question that needs addressing in order for the new division to have a successful future

The 2021 World Endurance Championship opener at Spa last weekend offered a taste of a bright new era for top-flight sportscar racing. We finally got to see a Le Mans Hypercar in anger, but we also received a wake-up call about the political machinations and manoeuvrings that will inevitably be a part of the brave new world that lies ahead.

The WEC's Hypercar class, which will incorporate the LMDh machinery from Porsche, Audi, Acura on occasion and perhaps others in 2023, is a Balance of Performance category. If you don't like it, tough, because it has played a key role in rekindling the massive interest from major manufacturers in the pinnacle of prototype racing.

Previous article Porsche and Penske unite to run new LMDh prototype in WEC, IMSA
Next article Glickenhaus only entering one LMH for FIA WEC debut at Portimao

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