What to expect from the NASCAR All-Star Race at Texas

Just about everything has changed with this weekend's NASCAR All-Star Race, including its location, as Texas Motor Speedway plays host to the non-championship event with $1 million up for grabs.

What to expect from the NASCAR All-Star Race at Texas

The annual competition among many of the Cup Series’ top drivers is getting a dramatic reboot this year, only the second iteration of the event to be held away from its traditional base at Charlotte Motor Speedway since 1986 after the COVID-19 pandemic forced the event to be moved to Bristol Motor Speedway last year.

The race on 13 June will feature six rounds, totalling 100 laps. The starting lineup for the first round has been determined by a random draw, with 2019 All-Star winner Kyle Larson (Hendrick Motorsports) on pole ahead of 2017 winner Kyle Busch (Joe Gibbs Racing).

The first four rounds will be 15 laps each, before a 30-lap round five and a 10-lap shootout to decide the winner.

At the beginning of round two, the field will be inverted by a random draw featuring a minimum of eight cars and a maximum of 12. Then, before the start of round three, the entire field will be inverted.

Another random draw to invert the field (with a minimum of eight and maximum of 12) will occur prior to round four, with the drivers’ cumulative finish from the opening four rounds determining the grid for round five.

The lowest cumulative finisher starts on the pole, second-lowest starts second, and so forth. All cars must enter pit road for a mandatory four-tyre pit stop during round five.

The finishing order of round five will then set the the starting positions for the final round - where the winner will be awarded $1 million. An additional prize of $100,000 is open to the fastest team on pit road during the mandatory pit stop.

Martin Truex Jr., Joe Gibbs Racing, Toyota Camry Bass Pro Shops pit stop

Martin Truex Jr., Joe Gibbs Racing, Toyota Camry Bass Pro Shops pit stop

Photo by: Matthew T. Thacker / NKP / Motorsport Images

There are 17 drivers already locked into the All-Star race by virtue of either winning a Cup Series race in 2020 or 2021, or having previously won the All-Star race or a Cup title.

Four more drivers will qualify for the main event on Sunday via the 50-lap All-Star Open race and a fan vote.

The All-Star Open will be run in three rounds – two lots of 20 laps, followed by a 10-lap shootout – with the three round winners advancing to the All-Star main event. Fan balloting will determine the final driver in the field.

Tyler Reddick (Richard Childress Racing) will start the All-Star Open from pole as the highest-placed driver in the points standings who is not eligible to automatically qualify for the All-Star race.

Chris Buescher (Roush Fenway Racing), Matt DiBenedetto (Wood Brothers Racing), Ricky Stenhouse Jr. (JTG Daugherty Racing), Ross Chastain (Chip Ganassi Racing) and Bubba Wallace (23XI Racing) fill out the top six on the grid based on their 2021 points.

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