What Monaco GP clues can we get from Spain's Sector 3 data

The unique tight and twisty nature of Formula 1's Monaco Grand Prix often makes it a pretty tricky track to try to predict form.

What Monaco GP clues can we get from Spain's Sector 3 data

It requires the maximum amount of downforce, a well-handing chassis, excellent traction and being good on the brakes.

And, whereas at other tracks, aero efficiency can be the name of the game as teams trim out downforce levels, at Monaco that does not matter. Power too isn't critical.

All these factors mean the competitive order can be very different at Monaco compared to other venues, which adds another layer of intrigue for F1's blue riband event.

But each year, there is one clue offered about how things are going to shape up.

It's the performance of cars through Sector 3 at the Barcelona circuit, for the low speed sequence of bends and the tight chicane pretty much mirror the demands of the streets of Monaco.

If you are quick through Sector 3 in Spain, then that's normally a pretty good sign.

Lewis Hamilton, Mercedes W12, Valtteri Bottas, Mercedes W12

Lewis Hamilton, Mercedes W12, Valtteri Bottas, Mercedes W12

Photo by: Charles Coates / Motorsport Images

So how did things stack up at the recent Spanish GP? Here's the fastest Sector 3 times for each car in qualifying.

1. Red Bull 26.295s
2. Mercedes 26.400s
3. Ferrari 26.580s
4. Alpine 26.632s
5. McLaren 26.782s
6. AlphaTauri 26.827s
7. Aston Martin 26.923s
8. Williams 27.131s
9. Alfa Romeo 27.164s
10. Haas 27.311s

For Red Bull, after two races where it has lost out to Mercedes, the prospects look good with its car the fastest through S3.

Sergio Perez is certainly bullish about what could be on the cards for the RB16B around the streets of Monte Carlo.

"I'm looking forward massively to Monaco, especially with this car," said the Mexican. "I think we have a shot of winning the race."

Valtteri Bottas, Mercedes AMG W10

Valtteri Bottas, Mercedes AMG W10

Photo by: Joe Portlock / Motorsport Images

Mercedes also thinks that things are tipped in Red Bull's favour, especially as it appears its Milton Keynes rival has a downforce advantage.

Trackside engineering director Andrew Shovlin said: "On paper, I would probably say it would suit Red Bull more than us.

"We've been running our max downforce wing and we saw it on their car on Friday [in Spain] but they didn't race it there, so they can put a bit more downforce on. So on paper, it's probably for them."

The fight behind the top two also looks intriguing, with early season 'best of the rest' contender McLaren not appearing as comfortable in the low speed sector as Ferrari and Alpine.

Ferrari's Carlos Sainz Jr reckons it was certainly a good boost for the Maranello team that they looked so strong in S3.

"Obviously having good downforce in the last sector gives you a good feeling and it puts you in a good state of mind going to Monaco because, for sure, you prefer to be quick in sector three in Barcelona," he said.

"But at the same time, Monaco then has a lot of specifics with car set-up, and tyre preparation for qualifying. The cars are so different in Monaco that it could change a bit the picture."

Lando Norris, McLaren MCL34

Lando Norris, McLaren MCL34

Photo by: Joe Portlock / Motorsport Images

McLaren certainly thinks the picture is not defined, and believes that there is scope for the competitive picture to change once the downforce is whacked on this weekend.

Lando Norris said: "The big difference between Monaco and sector three in Spain is obviously we run the set-up very different in Spain.

"It's a lot more focused to sector one and sector two, with the high speed turns. And it is quite the opposite in Monaco where there is a lot more low speed. We also run a lot softer the whole car because of the bumps and everything like that.

"I think the whole characteristic of the car is to change a lot. So it's quite an unexplored territory for this car and so on."

Read Also:

The other ultimate truth of Monaco is that it's a weekend where drivers being error free, not hitting traffic in qualifying, a well timed safety car and not being hit by bad luck can often be just as important in the fight for wins as having a good car.

As Shovlin says: "Even if you go there with the best car and you've got a great package, it's still an awfully difficult race to win."

shares
comments

Related video

Williams in "final throes" of adding updates to 2021 car

Previous article

Williams in "final throes" of adding updates to 2021 car

Next article

Brown: Hamilton and Verstappen crash is a "matter of time"

Brown: Hamilton and Verstappen crash is a "matter of time"
Load comments
The forgotten F1 comeback that began Jordan’s odyssey  Plus

The forgotten F1 comeback that began Jordan’s odyssey 

Before Michael Schumacher – or anyone else – had driven the 191 (or 911 as it was initially called), Eddie Jordan turned to a fellow Irishman to test his new Formula 1 car. JOHN WATSON, a grand prix winner for Penske and McLaren, recalls his role in the birth of a legend…

The squandered potential of a 70s F1 underdog Plus

The squandered potential of a 70s F1 underdog

A podium finisher in its first outing but then never again, the BRM P201 was a classic case of an opportunity squandered by disorganisation and complacency, says STUART CODLING

Formula 1
Sep 18, 2021
The other notable Monza escape that F1 should learn from Plus

The other notable Monza escape that F1 should learn from

OPINION: The headlines were dominated by the Italian Grand Prix crash between Max Verstappen and Lewis Hamilton, who had the halo to thank for avoiding potentially serious injury. But two days earlier, Formula 1 had a lucky escape with a Monza pitlane incident that could also have had grave consequences

Formula 1
Sep 17, 2021
How Monza only added more questions to F1's sprint race conundrum Plus

How Monza only added more questions to F1's sprint race conundrum

With two sprint races under its belt, Formula 1 must now consider its options for them going forward. While they've helped deliver exciting racing on Sundays, the sprints themselves have been somewhat lacking - creating yet another conundrum for F1 to solve...

Formula 1
Sep 16, 2021
Who should Alfa Romeo sign for 2022's F1 season? Plus

Who should Alfa Romeo sign for 2022's F1 season?

OPINION: With Valtteri Bottas already signed up for 2022, all eyes are on the race for the second seat at Alfa Romeo next year. Antonio Giovinazzi is the current incumbent, but faces a tough competition from appealing short and long-term prospects

Formula 1
Sep 15, 2021
The "forced break" that was key to Ricciardo's Monza excellence Plus

The "forced break" that was key to Ricciardo's Monza excellence

OPINION: Daniel Ricciardo has long been considered one of Formula 1’s elite drivers. But his struggles at McLaren since switching from Renault for 2021 have been painful to watch at times. Yet he’s recovered to banish those memories with a famous Monza win – built on a critically important foundation

Formula 1
Sep 14, 2021
How Verstappen is ruining his F1 title battle with Hamilton Plus

How Verstappen is ruining his F1 title battle with Hamilton

OPINION: The Italian GP clash between Lewis Hamilton and Max Verstappen followed a running theme in the 2021 Formula 1 title fight. Their close-quarters battles have often resulted in contact - and although Hamilton has shown a willingness to back off, Verstappen must learn to temper his aggression

Formula 1
Sep 14, 2021
Italian Grand Prix Driver Ratings Plus

Italian Grand Prix Driver Ratings

Two drivers produced maximum-score performances as, for the second year in a row, Monza threw up an unpredictable result that left several others ruing what might have been

Formula 1
Sep 13, 2021