Q & A with Toyota's Luca Marmorini

Conducted and provided by Toyota's press office.

Q & A with Toyota's Luca Marmorini

Conducted and provided by Toyota's press office.

Q. Luca, how has the Toyota engine department tackled the new "one engine, two race weekend" rule?

Luca Marmorini - Toyota's Technical Director - Engine:

We have been working on the design of our RVX-05 engine since the end of 2003, but more intensively since the inaugural tests with the new unit in September 2004. At that time, the engine was more of a hybrid version, utilising the existing fixation points in the TF104B car. Although the engine was almost in its final configuration, we have only really been able to fine-tune the RVX-05 since January, when it was mounted on to the TF105 with new fixation points. The design concept was an extension of what we had in place when we had to develop an engine to last for one race weekend in 2004. To elongate the life of the engine to race weekends, we had to adapt the RVX-04 to this new ruling, by putting each and every component of the engine through rigorous reliability checks at our factory in Cologne.

Q. What simulation techniques have been used in developing the RVX-05?

LM:

We have made full us of our in-house research and development facilities and transient dynos to develop the RVX-05. Since the first moment when we started to extend the reliability of the engine components, we have always been getting closer and closer to a race weekend simulation. On the track, we have been more aggressive in our approach in order to pre-empt any potential problems. What is missing though is the unpredictable nature of racing. To simulate an engine to run over two race weekends has been even harder because this unpredictability is greater still. We do not do long runs with the engine for each individual track. Instead, we use the dynos to simulate running at tracks that place greater stress on the engine, like the old Hockenheimring or Spa, to gather more representative data. Our homologation process and approach remains the same, but the specific details become more refined to track usage.

Q. What are the differences between in-house tests on the dyno, on-track running at tests and actual racing?

LM:

There are a lot of parts that can be fully tested and homologated in the dyno without even being run in the car at a track, internal reciprocating parts for example. However parts like the exhaust undergo varying stresses at the race track, so it requires a more detailed testing procedure. Gear-shifting is also a fantastic tool, once it is programmed in the dyno, but a driver shifts gears in a less rigid way in race conditions, so we have to take that into consideration as well.

Q. What problems have you encountered during this process?

LM:

As expected, we found some problems in the first runs with the TF105, which is not a reflection on the car, but typical teething problems that we face every time a new engine is run for the first time â€" unexpected vibration levels, for example. These issues are relatively straight-forward to overcome, so we have been predominantly focussed on solving the more terminal reliability problems that will actually stop us in race conditions. Putting mileage on the unit has been crucial to our development and I have been encouraged by how many kilometres we have been able to complete since January.

Q. Can you tell us about any of the bigger problems that you have faced?

LM:

In the TF105, we are using a different shape of exhaust, so we initially experienced some difficulties with exhaust tuning. We have also seen reliability issues with other parts, related to the quality of the parts produced. I am pleased to see that we have reacted quickly and efficiently to these challenges and we head to Melbourne with confidence high.

Q. Looking to Australia, what effects does the Albert Park circuit have on the engine?

LM:

The Australian Grand Prix is the first race in which we run in warmer conditions. Even though we test in Spain in the run-up to the race, it is still not as warm as Melbourne, and nowhere near the heat that we have in Malaysia. The opening race of the season is always a lottery, to be honest, but I feel that we have done all we can as a team to put ourselves in the best shape possible. Aside from the engine, we will also only see how the weather affects tyre degradation levels, which â€" with the introduction of the one tyre per race rule for 2005 â€" will be make or break for any team's performance in the race this season. We have tried to cover all angles when dealing with engine preparations for Australia, but we will only see the fruits of our labours in Melbourne.

Q. How demanding is the Albert Park track?

LM:

Actually, Albert Park is not an especially tough track, but it is the first track we race it in the season and that is what makes is demanding. Only after the Australian Grand Prix will we know in which direction we are heading, whether we have got it right and in what areas we still need to improve. As a track, it is intermediate in terms of engine stress levels and approximately 60% of the lap is driven at full throttle. But it is the uncertainty surrounding all teams' performances that make the race unique.

Q. What are the plans for developing the engine throughout the season?

LM:

With the new rules, we are not able to change engine between Australia and Malaysia unless there is a failure â€" and we are certainly not integrating that into our development plan! Usually, for the first three overseas races, we collect as much information about the engine as we can to see if everything works well. Only once we are confident with the reliability will we think about bringing in performance upgrades. We planned to introduce a new spec engine in time for the start of the European season, which in terms of engines and rules, means the fifth race of the year in Barcelona.

Q. At what point of the season will Toyota turn its attention from engine reliability to performance?

LM:

We will never compromise reliability for performance, so developments during the year have to take both parameters into account. It is more difficult to gain horsepower with the technical limitations, so this has been a real challenge for us. We already have several development steps in our pockets for the season, but we have to assess the situation after the first four races of the year. I am confident in that respect, but reliability is and will continue to be the decisive factor â€" you can't score points if you don't finish the race.

Q. What are your hopes for Australia?

LM:

My personal hopes as Technical Director Engine extend to the end of the race in Malaysia, where I sincerely hope we finish the Malaysian Grand Prix with the same two engines with which we race in Melbourne â€" and with some championship points as a reward.

shares
comments
Australia Preview Quotes: Toyota
Previous article

Australia Preview Quotes: Toyota

Next article

Toyota duo stay realistic

Toyota duo stay realistic
The Mercedes F1 pressure changes under 10 years of Toto Wolff Plus

The Mercedes F1 pressure changes under 10 years of Toto Wolff

OPINION: Although the central building blocks for Mercedes’ recent, long-lasting Formula 1 success were installed before he joined the team, Toto Wolff has been instrumental in ensuring it maximised its finally-realised potential after years of underachievement. The 10-year anniversary of Wolff joining Mercedes marks the perfect time to assess his work

The all-French F1 partnership that Ocon and Gasly hope to emulate Plus

The all-French F1 partnership that Ocon and Gasly hope to emulate

Alpine’s signing of Pierre Gasly alongside Esteban Ocon revives memories of a famous all-French line-up, albeit in the red of Ferrari, for BEN EDWARDS. Can the former AlphaTauri man's arrival help the French team on its path back to winning ways in a tribute act to the Prancing Horse's title-winning 1983?

Formula 1
Jan 31, 2023
How do the best races of F1 2022 stack up to 2021? Plus

How do the best races of F1 2022 stack up to 2021?

OPINION: A system to score all the grands prix from the past two seasons produces some interesting results and sets a standard that 2023 should surely exceed

Formula 1
Jan 31, 2023
Who were the fastest drivers in F1 2022? Plus

Who were the fastest drivers in F1 2022?

Who was the fastest driver in 2022? Everyone has an opinion, but what does the stopwatch say? Obviously, differing car performance has an effect on ultimate laptime – but it’s the relative speed of each car/driver package that’s fascinating and enlightening says ALEX KALINAUCKAS

Formula 1
Jan 30, 2023
Why F1's nearly man is refreshed and ready for his return Plus

Why F1's nearly man is refreshed and ready for his return

He has more starts without a podium than anyone else in Formula 1 world championship history, but Nico Hulkenberg is back for one more shot with Haas. After spending three years on the sidelines, the revitalised German is aiming to prove to his new team what the F1 grid has been missing

Formula 1
Jan 29, 2023
The potential-laden F1 car that Ferrari neglected Plus

The potential-laden F1 car that Ferrari neglected

The late Mauro Forghieri played a key role in Ferrari’s mid-1960s turnaround, says STUART CODLING, and his pretty, intricate 1512 was among the most evocative cars of the 1.5-litre era. But a victim of priorities as Formula 1 was deemed less lucrative than success in sportscars, its true potential was never seen in period

Formula 1
Jan 28, 2023
Why Vasseur relishes 'feeling the pressure' as Ferrari's F1 boss Plus

Why Vasseur relishes 'feeling the pressure' as Ferrari's F1 boss

OPINION: Fred Vasseur has spent only a few weeks as team principal for the Ferrari Formula 1 team, but is already intent on taking the Scuderia back to the very top. And despite it being arguably the most demanding job in motorsport, the Frenchman is relishing the challenge

Formula 1
Jan 27, 2023
The crucial tech changes F1 teams must adapt to in 2023 Plus

The crucial tech changes F1 teams must adapt to in 2023

Changes to the regulations for season two of Formula 1's ground-effects era aim to smooth out last year’s troubles and shut down loopholes. But what areas have been targeted, and what impact will this have?

Formula 1
Jan 26, 2023