F1’s 2023 floor changes could leave smaller teams unable to carry over chassis

Formula 1’s smaller teams may be unable to carry over their chassis in to next year if the FIA goes ahead with radical floor changes.

F1’s 2023 floor changes could leave smaller teams unable to carry over chassis

With F1’s regulations originally set to remain unchanged for next year, some of F1’s smaller outfits were considering rolling over key elements of their current cars to help save costs.

But with the FIA’s porpoising intervention currently set to extend to a dramatic raising of the floor edges for next year, that could force everyone to design all-new chassis for 2023.

At the moment, the FIA plans to raise the floor edges by 25mm, but at least half the grid is pushing for a less dramatic change.

While the new rules could prompt expensive new development paths for the top teams, the impact could be greater on those squads that wanted to carry over key elements in to 2023.

It could also mean expensive new work for smaller squads who have already tried to get a head start with next year’s car.

Red Bull team principal Christian Horner said: “I think it’s actually an even bigger issue for some of the smaller teams, that quite simply would not have the resource to be able to react. I think whatever measure is taken, it just needs to be sensible.”

AlphaTauri’s head of vehicle performance Guillaume Dezoteux has explained that a 25mm change was enough to prompt a major rethink about items that define chassis design.

“We are in the period of defining the key parameters of next year's car,” he explained.

“What should be the fuel volume? What should be the optimal weight distribution of the car?

“So now changing the aero rules is a big challenge for the teams, because you need to first understand the impact on the overall car performance. And it's an estimation from this where you go, ‘we can afford to reduce the fuel volume, we can afford to change the weight distribution target, we can afford to do this or that.’

“If it keeps changing, then you have made some calls that are too late to be modified. The chassis will be released in the next few weeks.”

Pierre Gasly, AlphaTauri AT03

Pierre Gasly, AlphaTauri AT03

Photo by: Zak Mauger / Motorsport Images

Asked if the change of concept was enough to force teams to build an entirely new chassis, Dezoteux said: “Yeah, I would say so.

“Obviously if you raise the floor edge, with the target to reduce the downforce of the car, especially in the high speed corner, that changes a lot: like how much energy you put on the tyres, and what the suspension is doing.

“It changes the suspension range, because maybe you need to be able to raise the car. If you said today that we would have to raise the car 20 millimetres, because we have a thicker plank, then we couldn't do it, because our suspension has not been designed to achieve that.

“The entire project is very linked. So when you change one parameter, generally it impacts everything else.”

Read Also:

While the majority of teams do intend to build all-new chassis for 2023, especially because they can make decent gains with weight saving, Alfa Romeo has hinted that it may carry over a lot of elements in to next year.

Jan Monchaux, Alfa Romeo’s technical director, said: “Seeing that we are a rather small team, we will have to have potentially a slightly more aggressive carry over strategy than some of the bigger outfits.

“In the winter, with the force we have, redoing everything, that would force us to outsource and that would probably end up being too expensive and jeopardise our development budget during the season. So we are going to carry over some elements.

“Check the cars in February and then you will find out which ones, but they are going to be pretty visible I suppose.”

shares
comments

Related video

F1 Hungarian GP qualifying - Start time, how to watch & more
Previous article

F1 Hungarian GP qualifying - Start time, how to watch & more

Next article

Sauber F1 partnership renewed for 2023, says Alfa Romeo CEO

Sauber F1 partnership renewed for 2023, says Alfa Romeo CEO
How the last Sauber-built Alfa offers F1 2023 evolution clues Plus

How the last Sauber-built Alfa offers F1 2023 evolution clues

Alfa Romeo has become the first Formula 1 team to reveal a new car for 2023, in addition to a fresh livery. This offered a first look at some of the understated changes produced by the revised regulations, along with points of convergence in the second year of the ground effect rules

The pioneering F1 car that preceded Lotus’s terminal decline Plus

The pioneering F1 car that preceded Lotus’s terminal decline

In the hands of Ayrton Senna the actively suspended 99T would be the last F1 race-winning Lotus but, as STUART CODLING reveals, it was a complicated machine that caused more problems than it solved

Formula 1
Feb 5, 2023
How Tyrrell became a racing Rubik’s cube as it faded out of F1 Plus

How Tyrrell became a racing Rubik’s cube as it faded out of F1

Formula 1’s transformation into a global sport meant the gradual extinction for a small team determined to stay true to its low-budget roots. But Tyrrell would eventually be reborn as a world-beating outfit again, explains MAURICE HAMILTON, albeit in different colours…

Formula 1
Feb 4, 2023
Assessing Hamilton's remarkable decade as a Mercedes F1 driver Plus

Assessing Hamilton's remarkable decade as a Mercedes F1 driver

Many doubted Lewis Hamilton’s move from McLaren to Mercedes for the 2013 Formula 1 season. But the journey he’s been on since has taken the Briton to new heights - and to a further six world championship titles

Formula 1
Feb 2, 2023
Why new look Haas is a litmus test for Formula 1’s new era Plus

Why new look Haas is a litmus test for Formula 1’s new era

OPINION: With teams outside the top three having struggled in Formula 1 in recent seasons, the rules changes introduced in 2022 should have more of an impact this season. How well Haas does, as the poster child for the kind of team that F1 wanted to be able to challenge at the front, is crucial

Formula 1
Feb 2, 2023
The Mercedes F1 pressure changes under 10 years of Toto Wolff Plus

The Mercedes F1 pressure changes under 10 years of Toto Wolff

OPINION: Although the central building blocks for Mercedes’ recent, long-lasting Formula 1 success were installed before he joined the team, Toto Wolff has been instrumental in ensuring it maximised its finally-realised potential after years of underachievement. The 10-year anniversary of Wolff joining Mercedes marks the perfect time to assess his work

Formula 1
Feb 1, 2023
The all-French F1 partnership that Ocon and Gasly hope to emulate Plus

The all-French F1 partnership that Ocon and Gasly hope to emulate

Alpine’s signing of Pierre Gasly alongside Esteban Ocon revives memories of a famous all-French line-up, albeit in the red of Ferrari, for BEN EDWARDS. Can the former AlphaTauri man's arrival help the French team on its path back to winning ways in a tribute act to the Prancing Horse's title-winning 1983?

Formula 1
Jan 31, 2023
How do the best races of F1 2022 stack up to 2021? Plus

How do the best races of F1 2022 stack up to 2021?

OPINION: A system to score all the grands prix from the past two seasons produces some interesting results and sets a standard that 2023 should surely exceed

Formula 1
Jan 31, 2023