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Max Verstappen, Red Bull Racing RB20, Sergio Perez, Red Bull Racing RB20, Lando Norris, McLaren MCL38, Carlos Sainz, Ferrari SF-24, Fernando Alonso, Aston Martin AMR24, Oscar Piastri, McLaren MCL38, the rest of the field for the restart
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The changes that resulted from F1’s evolution into a truly global player

50 years ago TIM WRIGHT decided that designing nuclear boilers and ejector seats wasn’t for him – and went to work for race car manufacturer March Engineering. Back then, cars were drawn on paper and team hospitality amounted to a round of takeaway pizzas. Five decades later, having race-engineered Alain Prost, Gerhard Berger, Johnny Herbert and others in F1, plus a Le Mans 24 Hours victory for Peugeot, he reflects on how F1 has grown from a backwater sport into a multi-billion-pound enterprise…

When I look back over the years I’ve been involved in motor racing and in particular Formula 1, it’s amazing to see the extent of the changes. Whether those were for good or bad, or somewhere between those points, depends on your perspective.

I stepped on to the employment ladder by way of a mechanical engineering apprenticeship with a company specialising in steam and nuclear boilers, a good grounding in practical engineering, but not what I wanted as a career. My training was to be a draughtsman, which helped me to hone my skills since I’d always enjoyed freehand drawing and sketching. While being able to use a computer, with programs that remove the need for a set square or an eraser, is now perhaps more of a prerequisite for design jobs, let’s not forget that Adrian Newey’s office still contains a drawing board and a set of French curves.

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