Renault's involvement in F1 a big success - president Carlos Ghosn

Renault president Carlos Ghosn says the French manufacturer's involvement in Formula 1 is a big success, and insists the company will continue in the sport as long as it feels that way

Renault's involvement in F1 a big success - president Carlos Ghosn

Renault has won the last three championships as an engine supplier to Red Bull, but said earlier this year that it felt it was not getting the credit it deserved.

Red Bull's title sponsor Infiniti also sponsors Renault's engines, which limits the French brand's exposure.

Ghosn is convinced, however, that Formula 1 continues to make sense for his company.

Why Mercedes is better off than Renault

"I think it is a success for the Renault brand because you have to link into the strategy of the brand," Ghosn said.

"When you are analysing the exposure of Formula 1 in countries like Russia, China, India, Brazil, the south east of Asia, North Africa and even Africa, this is a very popular sport that people watch very closely.

"The fact [is] people associate your brand with an engine and a team that is winning.

"People can see that Renault means technology, that Renault means reliability."

Ghosn said that while Renault needs to finds ways to justify the money spent in Formula 1, there are no doubts about its short-term commitment to the sport.

"As long as it make sense for the company," he said when asked how long would Renault be in F1.

"We have invested a lot in the new technology coming in 2014. Nobody can say if it will continue to make sense 10 to 15 years down the road.

"You always have to justify all the investment Renault is making in Formula 1 and I want my marketers to tell me how much we're gaining. As long as we are gaining, we will continue. Today, we are gaining, so we'll continue."

Ghosn did however rule out Renault returning to F1 with its own team, as he is sure being an engine supplier is the best way forward.

"Frankly I don't think it would make much sense for us to come back as one team," he explained.

"The chance to be associated with many teams, with different groups, makes much more sense. In terms of technology, in terms of exposure, in terms of support to Formula 1, we feel much better with the present configuration.

"This is where we think we make the best contribution to, and get the best return from, Formula 1."

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Series Formula 1
Teams Renault F1 Team
Author Jonathan Noble
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