Renault confirms it is renegotiating F1 deal with Red Bull

Renault has confirmed it is renegotiating its contract with Red Bull after making clear it is no longer willing to be an engine supplier, and questioning the Formula 1 team's sportsmanship

Renault confirms it is renegotiating F1 deal with Red Bull

The French car manufacturer is currently involved in with regard to taking a majority stake in the team, and also with F1 boss Bernie Ecclestone over whether it will be granted historical status, which in turn will ensure it receives a greater share of future revenues.

CEO Carlos Ghosn, however, has confirmed for the first time the company's days of being an engine supplier are over.

Speaking at the Frankfurt Motor Show, Ghosn said: "We said very clearly, it's finished.

"We already alerted the Formula 1 authorities [saying] that 'Don't count on us as a provider of an engine. It's over'.

"We will honour our contracts, no problem, but the occasion of Renault as a developer and supplier of engines stops."

Renault has deals in place with Red Bull and Toro Rosso through to the end of 2016, with the former previously granted number one status.

Red Bull, however, is understood to have a year early, and is now in the throes of trying to line up after Mercedes one of its main rivals.

"I think we are today renegotiating the contracts, so it's too early to say what's going to be the conclusion of the contract," added Ghosn.

The 61-year-old Brazilian, however, has expressed displeasure at the criticism Renault has been subjected to by Red Bull over the past 18 months after four years of powering the team to the constructors' and drivers' titles from 2010-13.

Renault has struggled to adapt to the V6 turbo-powered era, resulting in strong words from the likes of Red Bull owner Dietrich Mateschitz and team principal Christian Horner.

An unhappy Ghosn said: "Unfortunately when we were winning championships the Renault name was never mentioned. It was the team that was winning.

"So we started to feel the return on this investment was very weak.

"It was intensified by the fact that when the technology changed and we moved from the V8 engine to the present technology, some of the teams using our engine did not fare well, and the reasons for which they are not performing became the engine.

"So you are in the game that when you perform very well you are never mentioned, and when there is a problem with the team you are the first guy to be pointed [at].

"Are the criticisms fair or unfair? I don't think it's a question of being fair or unfair.

"It's a sport. You can't just say 'I lost, but my team-mate was really...' you know?

"I think it's a question of sportsmanship. We are expecting, that when we are in a sport working with other people, we win together and we lose together."

shares
comments
Mexican GP corner named after F1 world champion Nigel Mansell

Previous article

Mexican GP corner named after F1 world champion Nigel Mansell

Next article

Who is the best of British?

Who is the best of British?
Load comments

About this article

Series Formula 1
Teams Renault F1 Team , Red Bull Racing
Author Jim Holder
What Mercedes must do to keep its F1 title challenge on track Plus

What Mercedes must do to keep its F1 title challenge on track

Mercedes may find itself leading the drivers' and constructors' standings after Lewis Hamilton's victory in the Bahrain Grand Prix, but it is well-aware that it came against the odds, with Red Bull clearly ahead on pace. Here's what the Brackley team must do to avoid its crown slipping

Why Tsunoda can become Japan’s greatest F1 talent Plus

Why Tsunoda can become Japan’s greatest F1 talent

While Japan's fever for motor racing is well-documented, the country has yet to produce a Formula 1 superstar – but that could be about to change, says BEN EDWARDS

Why the demise of F1's hypocritical spending habit is cause for celebration Plus

Why the demise of F1's hypocritical spending habit is cause for celebration

For too long, F1's richest teams have justified being able to spend as much as they want because that's the way they've always conducted their business. STUART CODLING says that's no reason not to kick a bad habit

Formula 1
Apr 14, 2021
The double whammy that is defining Vettel’s F1 fate Plus

The double whammy that is defining Vettel’s F1 fate

It's been a tough start to Sebastian Vettel's Aston Martin F1 career, with a lack of pre-season testing mileage followed by an incident-packed Bahrain GP. But two key underlying factors mean a turnaround is not guaranteed

Formula 1
Apr 14, 2021
The diva that stole a march on F1’s wide-bodied opposition Plus

The diva that stole a march on F1’s wide-bodied opposition

In 2017 new F1 technical regulations were supposed to add drama - and peg Mercedes back. STUART CODLING looks at the car which, while troubled, set the stage for the wide-bodied Formula 1 era

Formula 1
Apr 13, 2021
The themes to watch in F1’s Imola return Plus

The themes to watch in F1’s Imola return

Three weeks is a long time in Formula 1, but in the reshaped start to the 2021 season the teams head to Imola to pick things up after the frenetic Bahrain opener. Here's what to look out for and the developments to follow at the Emilia Romagna Grand Prix

Formula 1
Apr 13, 2021
The 'new' F1 drivers who need to improve at Imola Plus

The 'new' F1 drivers who need to improve at Imola

After a pandemic-hit winter of seat-swapping, F1 kicked off its season with several new faces in town, other drivers adapting to new environments, and one making a much-anticipated comeback. BEN ANDERSON looks at who made the most of their opportunity and who needs to try harder…

Formula 1
Apr 12, 2021
The delay that quashed Aston Martin’s last F1 venture Plus

The delay that quashed Aston Martin’s last F1 venture

Aston Martin’s only previous foray into Formula 1 in the late 1950s was a short-lived and unsuccessful affair. But it could have been so different, says NIGEL ROEBUCK

Formula 1
Apr 10, 2021