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Mercedes, Red Bull say small team rebellion would only hurt F1

Radical action from Formula 1's small teams over Bernie Ecclestone's failure to address cost issues would do more harm than good, insist leading team bosses

After a United States Grand Prix weekend where the smaller outfits whipped up talk of a strike - even though they never actually threatened it openly - there is pressure on Ecclestone to address the matter.

Talks between Ecclestone and Sauber, Force India and Lotus were scheduled for this week, amid hopes that an agreement could be reached by the Brazilian GP.

COMMENT: Is Ecclestone losing his grip on F1?

Red Bull boss Christian Horner and Mercedes chief Toto Wolff have urged Ecclestone to prevent the current problems dragging on, and ensure the wild idea of a boycott does not become real.

Wolff said: "I'm not into strikes - it's kept me stranded with Air France and Lufthansa before.

"So I don't think a strike is what you do these days, and threatening to strike even less.

"I don't think it would be good for Formula 1. That wouldn't help the smaller teams either.

"It's about sitting around the table, clearing the air, saying this is what we think should happen and then discussing it with the commercial rights holder."

Horner believes a protest by the three teams would achieve nothing, and suggested that even talking about the idea was hurting F1's reputation.

"They are here to compete," he said.

"Force India is trying to beat McLaren. If they are sitting in the garage, they are not going to be going anywhere. That doesn't work.

"And doing it publicly is the wrong way to do it.

"What F1 has done during the last couple of weeks with the public slanging matches that have gone on are not good for the sport, because the sport should be focusing on what we have seen in America: good racing, wheel to wheel racing.

"The politics and the fiscal issues should be dealt behind closed doors, with the commercial rights holder, and get sorted."

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