Formula 1 to vote on hybrid qualifying format on Thursday

Formula 1 chiefs will vote on the fate of qualifying on Thursday, deciding whether or not to implement a hybrid format

Formula 1 to vote on hybrid qualifying format on Thursday

This would see Q1 and Q2 continue in the new elimination-style that made its debut on Saturday ahead of the Australian Grand Prix, but with minor tweaks.

GARY ANDERSON'S F1 qualifying blueprint

Q3, deemed such a disaster given the lack of action, will revert back to the old set-up to ensure audiences, both in the grandstands and at home, are kept entertained through to the last minute.

The move is a departure to what was initially determined by team principals on Sunday morning in Melbourne.

Following the apparent failure of the new system, and the wave of criticism that followed, team bosses voted to revert back to the old format - that had been in place since 2006 - in its entirety.

DIETER RENCKEN on the qualifying revamp confusion

That was to be with immediate effect from the forthcoming Bahrain Grand Prix, but keeping the door ajar for changes to be introduced from 2017 following more in-depth analysis of how, and whether, another scheme would work.

At higher levels, that has not been met with universal approval, and on reflection, and with the heat taken out of the situation, a more measured response has since been undertaken.

EDD STRAW: F1's backwards thinking is idiotic

Any change now requires unanimous approval from the F1 Commission, the 26-member panel that comprises representatives from the teams, promoters, sponsors, and tyre supplier Pirelli.

If the hybrid qualifying, which is seen as a compromise solution, fails to gain such support, then F1 will continue on with the knock-out system in its current guise.

It is anticipated, however, such unanimity will be granted, which will result in it then going forward to the World Motor Sport Council for ratification.

Force India deputy team principal Bob Fernley made clear he was against such a radical plan as going back to the old qualifying system, suggesting instead minor alterations should be made.

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