Force India F1 team may run under new name later in 2018 season

Force India could run under a new identity in Formula 1 this season if the FIA is satisfied that relevant legal issues have been properly addressed

Force India F1 team may run under new name later in 2018 season

It is understood that the team may be allowed by the FIA to run under its usual name at Spa if a situation with the new entry cannot be resolved in time.

An unexpected situation arose last week when plans for a consortium led by Lawrence Stroll to take the team out of administration could not be completed within the two-week deadline, mainly because of legal problems surrounding shareholders Vijay Mallya and the Sahara Group.

Consent from 13 Indian banks was required for the deal to go through, while it is understood that there was also a lien from drinks company Diageo in relation to a loan made to Mallya.

Failed bidder Uralkali suggested on Tuesday that the sale process was flawed, noting that "despite expiration of the deadline set by the Administrator, no rescue plan was submitted to the court for approval, which confirmed Uralkali's view that the rescue option was not achievable in the timeline and under conditions proposed by the administrator."

Late last week Stroll switched strategy and bought the assets of the team - its cars, Silverstone factory, equipment and everything required to run a team.

The actual entry in theory still belongs to Force India, which remains in administration but now has no physical assets.

The entry is usually regarded as a valuable element of any team sale, but the move by Renault, McLaren and Williams to block the transfer of commercial rights to Force India's new owners, meaning the team would not get the prize money it accrued in recent seasons, had already created a stumbling block.

This meant making a fresh start was not as much of a penalty as it would otherwise have been.

Although FIA sporting regulations specify teams have to enter for the following season by November 30, Article 8.1 appears to leave the door open for changes at a later date.

It reads: "Applications at other times will only be considered if a place is available and on payment of a late entry fee to be fixed by the FIA. Entry forms will be made available by the FIA who will notify the applicant of the result of the application within thirty days of its receipt."

A space is therefore available as the new team will replace itself, and in the context of the overall deal a late entry fee will be a minor consideration for Stroll.

The process of creating a new entry from an existing team is a complex one, with the Concorde Agreement to be considered as well as FIA regulations.

One legal complication is that an F1 team's entry has to be submitted via an ASN, which would previously have been India's.

Force India logos and references to Vijay Mallya's companies Kingfisher and UB Group were stripped from the team's trucks and signage at Spa on Wednesday.

shares
comments
F2 star Albon thinks he can earn Toro Rosso 2019 F1 shot
Previous article

F2 star Albon thinks he can earn Toro Rosso 2019 F1 shot

Next article

Formula 1 could delay its major engine rules revamp beyond 2021

Formula 1 could delay its major engine rules revamp beyond 2021
Load comments
The six F1 subplots to watch in 2022 as a new era begins Plus

The six F1 subplots to watch in 2022 as a new era begins

As Formula 1 prepares to begin a new era of technical regulations in 2022, Autosport picks out six other key elements to follow this season

Why newly-retired Raikkonen won't miss F1 Plus

Why newly-retired Raikkonen won't miss F1

After 349 grand prix starts, 46 fastest laps, 21 wins and one world championship, Kimi Raikkonen has finally called time on his F1 career. In an exclusive interview with Autosport on the eve of his final race, he explains his loathing of paddock politics and reflects on how motorsport has changed over the past two decades

Formula 1
Jan 23, 2022
Unpacking the technical changes behind F1 2022's rules shakeup Plus

Unpacking the technical changes behind F1 2022's rules shakeup

Formula 1 cars will look very different this year as the long-awaited fresh rules finally arrive with the stated aim of improving its quality of racing. Autosport breaks down what the return of 'ground effect' aerodynamics - and a flurry of other changes besides - means for the teams, and what fans can expect

Formula 1
Jan 21, 2022
Why new era F1 is still dogged by its old world problems Plus

Why new era F1 is still dogged by its old world problems

OPINION: The 2022 Formula 1 season is just weeks away from getting underway. But instead of focusing on what is to come, the attention still remains on what has been – not least the Abu Dhabi title decider controversy. That, plus other key talking points, must be resolved to allow the series to warmly welcome in its new era

Formula 1
Jan 20, 2022
The Schumacher trait that will give Haas hope in F1 2022 Plus

The Schumacher trait that will give Haas hope in F1 2022

Mick Schumacher’s knack of improving during his second season in a championship was a trademark of his junior formula career, so his progress during his rookie Formula 1 campaign with Haas was encouraging. His target now will be to turn that improvement into results as the team hopes to reap the rewards of sacrificing development in 2021

Formula 1
Jan 19, 2022
The “glorified taxi” driver central to F1’s continued safety push Plus

The “glorified taxi” driver central to F1’s continued safety push

As the driver of Formula 1’s medical car, Alan van der Merwe’s job is to wait – and hope his skills aren’t needed. JAMES NEWBOLD hears from F1’s lesser-known stalwarts

Formula 1
Jan 15, 2022
When BMW added F1 'rocket fuel' to ignite Brabham's 1983 title push Plus

When BMW added F1 'rocket fuel' to ignite Brabham's 1983 title push

There was an ace up the sleeve during the 1983 F1 title-winning season of Nelson Piquet and Brabham. It made a frontrunning car invincible for the last three races to see off Renault's Alain Prost and secure the combination's second world title in three years

Formula 1
Jan 13, 2022
How “abysmal” reliability blunted Brabham’s first winner Plus

How “abysmal” reliability blunted Brabham’s first winner

Brabham’s first world championship race-winning car was held back by unreliable Climax engines – or so its creators believed, as STUART CODLING explains

Formula 1
Jan 10, 2022