Lorenzo takes another Estoril win

Jorge Lorenzo maintained his unbeaten run at Estoril in MotoGP as he took his first win in two months in the Portuguese Grand Prix

Lorenzo takes another Estoril win

The Yamaha rider beat his team-mate Valentino Rossi in a head to head fight, the duo having pulled clear of the rest of the field after some close-fought early laps.

It was Rossi in front for most of the first half of the race, and he looked comfortable at first, leading by as much as 1.8 seconds.

But Lorenzo fought back, catching his team-mate and surging past under braking for the first corner on lap 17. Once ahead, he was unstoppable, taking his eighth victory of 2010 - and his first since Brno in August - with an 8.6-second margin.

The race saw drama even before the start, when Ben Spies crashed his Tech 3 Yamaha on the way to the grid and sustained a dislocated left ankle.

The opening laps then featured a spectacular dice between the two Yamahas, the two Ducatis and fast-starter Andrea Dovizioso, who briefly got up to second for Honda.

Ducati's Nicky Hayden battled his way through to lead for a lap before being shuffled back by the Yamaha duo and his team-mate Casey Stoner. The latter had lost ground with a few small errors but then charged up behind the two Yamahas, only to crash at the final corner on lap five.

That moved Hayden into a lonely third, where he seemed set to finish until his pace began to drop off and he was passed by Gresini Honda's Marco Simoncelli and Dovizioso.

The two Italians then mounted a huge battle for the last podium position. Dovizioso seemed to have made the decisive move into the first corner with two laps to go, only for Simoncelli to dive back through at the chicane on the last lap. It was not over though, as Dovizioso tucked in and got a better run through the last corner, drafting back into third by just 0.059s at the line. Hayden, Randy de Puniet (LCR Honda) and Colin Edwards (Tech 3) chased them home.

The still-recovering Dani Pedrosa impressed by getting up to sixth, before tailing off and falling back to eighth for Honda.

Marco Melandri could not turn his season-best sixth on the grid into a strong race result and was ninth for Gresini Honda, almost caught by Hector Barbera as the Aspar Ducati fended off Suzuki's Alvaro Bautista for the final top 10 spot. On a miserable day for Suzuki, Loris Capirossi was the last finisher in 13th.

Carlos Checa produced a plucky ride on his return with Pramac Ducati, running as high as 11th and battling hard with the regular MotoGP midfielders. But he pulled in to retire before half-distance, suffering from arm pump. His team-mate Aleix Espargaro crashed at the chicane on the opening lap, limping away from the accident in some discomfort.

Pos Rider Team Time/Gap 1. Jorge Lorenzo Yamaha 46m17.962s 2. Valentino Rossi Yamaha + 8.629s 3. Andrea Dovizioso Honda + 26.475s 4. Marco Simoncelli Gresini Honda + 26.534s 5. Nicky Hayden Ducati + 27.154s 6. Randy de Puniet LCR Honda + 28.297s 7. Colin Edwards Tech 3 Yamaha + 30.109s 8. Dani Pedrosa Honda + 44.947s 9. Marco Melandri Gresini Honda + 1m13.649s 10. Hector Barbera Aspar Ducati + 1m17.721s 11. Alvaro Bautista Suzuki + 1m17.908s 12. Hiroshi Aoyama Interwetten Honda + 1m33.025s 13. Loris Capirossi Suzuki + 1m39.752s Retirements: Carlos Checa Pramac Ducati 12 laps Casey Stoner  Ducati 4 laps Aleix Espargaro Pramac Ducati 0 laps Ben Spies Tech 3 Yamaha DNS 
shares
comments
Rossi fastest in extended warm-up
Previous article

Rossi fastest in extended warm-up

Next article

Rossi admits Lorenzo faster in dry

Rossi admits Lorenzo faster in dry
Load comments
Injury, COVID, camels and redemption: A MotoGP star's Dakar odyssey Plus

Injury, COVID, camels and redemption: A MotoGP star's Dakar odyssey

Danilo Petrucci’s decision to switch to rallying at the conclusion of his time in MotoGP at the end of 2021 raised many eyebrows. Deciding to make his rally raid debut at the Dakar courted scepticism. With his debut almost over on several occasions before it began, Petrucci’s Dakar odyssey was a wild affair full of ups, downs and a run-in with a camel. He sat down with Autosport to reveal all

Why a difficult 2021 hasn't broken one Honda MotoGP ace's resolve Plus

Why a difficult 2021 hasn't broken one Honda MotoGP ace's resolve

Pol Espargaro’s switch to Honda for 2021 was one of MotoGP’s biggest rider market shocks. But a difficult bike coupled with various external factors led to a difficult first campaign. As a critical 2022 campaign for both Espargaro and Honda looms, his 2021 experience hasn’t dented his long-held resolve

MotoGP
Jan 17, 2022
The Drive to Survive mistakes MotoGP must avoid in 2022 Plus

The Drive to Survive mistakes MotoGP must avoid in 2022

OPINION: MotoGP will get its own Drive to Survive-style series in 2022, airing on Amazon Prime Video. It’s a much-needed grab at the mainstream for MotoGP, but a paradigm shift in the series highlighted by one of its leading stars must be embraced and not overshadowed by a desire to replicate DTS’s popcorn drama

MotoGP
Jan 10, 2022
Why KTM's latest young outcast is a cautionary tale for MotoGP Plus

Why KTM's latest young outcast is a cautionary tale for MotoGP

Iker Lecuona’s absence from the 2022 MotoGP grid after losing his KTM ride will likely pass most onlookers by. But after just 30 race starts in a MotoGP move he was sucked into by circumstance, the World Superbike-bound 21-year-old's story should act as a warning to KTM - and MotoGP as a whole - in regards to its future stars

MotoGP
Jan 4, 2022
How Ducati's expanded roster will threaten MotoGP's balance in 2022 Plus

How Ducati's expanded roster will threaten MotoGP's balance in 2022

That Ducati will compete with eight prototypes in MotoGP this year is nothing new, having already done so between 2016 and 2018. But the involvement and coverage of the Borgo Panigale company in its alliances is now much greater than in past years, which could have the effect of unbalancing the premier class

MotoGP
Jan 3, 2022
Ranking the top 10 MotoGP riders of 2021 Plus

Ranking the top 10 MotoGP riders of 2021

Eight different riders won races across an ultra-competitive 2021 MotoGP season. Although Fabio Quartararo wrapped up the title with two rounds to go, the Yamaha rider had strong competition from the revitalised Ducati factory team and the world championship's returning king. Autosport picks out the year's 10 best riders

MotoGP
Dec 23, 2021
How Quartararo cast aside prior doubts to become MotoGP's new king Plus

How Quartararo cast aside prior doubts to become MotoGP's new king

Doubts were cast over Yamaha’s French recruit after his disastrous end to the 2020 MotoGP season with Petronas SRT, but Fabio Quartararo answered them convincingly in 2021 to claim a MotoGP title that exhibited both his devastating speed and mental strength

MotoGP
Dec 7, 2021
The Rossi-less future MotoGP must now navigate Plus

The Rossi-less future MotoGP must now navigate

Motorcycle racing's greatest showman has left the stage, as Valentino Rossi calls time on his remarkable career on two wheels. But in his successors, all of whom were inspired by 'the Doctor', grand prix racing has vibrant new acts to keep us hooked

MotoGP
Dec 4, 2021