Lamborghini Super Trofeo World Finals: Basz and Michelotto secure title

VS Racing’s Karol Basz and Mattia Michelotto claimed a resounding victory in the season-ending Lamborghini Super Trofeo World Finals at Misano Adriatico, winning both of the 50-minute races from pole position.

Lamborghini Super Trofeo World Finals: Basz and Michelotto secure title

The success comes just one week after VS Racing wrapped up the International GT Open championship title, which caps off a sensational season for the team.

North America took home the rest of the silverware. Precision Performance Motorsport’s Brandon Gdovic and Bryan Ortiz won the Pro-Am title, Victor Gomez (Change Racing) the Am crown and John Hennessy taking Lamborghini Cup title for US RaceTronics.

Pro/Pro-Am

Michelotto started Race 1 from pole position and duly maintained his advantage at the start, which was held under the floodlights due to a delay in the Saturday schedule. The #6 VS Racing Huracán headed the squabbling #127 Change Racing Huracán of Super Trofeo North America champion Richard Antinucci and the #33 Bonaldi Motorsport entry of Danny Kroes into Turn 1.

The pair went side-by-side at the first corner, with Kroes shortcutting the apex to grab second, a place he would quickly have to cede to Antinucci. Antinucci was the first to make his stop at the start of the window, while Michelotto stayed out, electing to extend his four-second margin even further.

Basz took over and increased the gap to 7.1s over Antinucci, who managed to peg back the Polish driver in the second stint, eventually getting to within 2.8s at the flag. Completing the podium in the Pro category was Kroes and his team-mate Daan Pijl; the pair continuing their strong end-of-season form which produced a clean sweep of the Super Trofeo Europe races.

Basz and Michelotto started Race 2 from pole as well, with the former producing a carbon-copy start to lead Antinucci and Dario Capitanio (both Dream Racing Motorsport) into the first corner. Further around the opening lap, the main contenders for the Super Trofeo Europe title came together at Turn 14, as Weering slid into the side of Gilardoni under braking, with a secondary impact breaking Weering’s rear suspension and forcing both into retirement.

Contact also took out a trio of other potential winners inside the first quarter of an hour, as Bonaldi Motorsport team-mates Daan Pijl and Milan Teekens were caught up in a collision with Novamarine GSM Racing’s Kikko Galbiati at Turn 4. Pijl and Teekens were out on the spot, while Galbiati’s race ended soon after in the pits.

Much like the first race, Antinucci struggled to match the pace of Basz and Michelotto and, despite making his stop first, emerged from the pit sequence six seconds adrift. That margin extended to well over 11 seconds before being reduced to nine by the finish as Basz and Michelotto secured the race win and title.

Precision Performance Motorsport’s Brandon Gdovic and Bryan Ortiz prevailed in an enthralling Pro-Am title battle thanks to a late-race pass from Gdovic on main rival Claudio Senhoreti with just two laps left in the second race. Gdovic and Ortiz came out on top in a classic tortoise and hare race in the Pro-Am class, edging the charging Loris Spinelli (MCR Racing) to the line by a little under two seconds.

Gdovic started the #146 machine third behind the VIP car of Davide Valsecchi and the pole-sitting Leipert Motorsport entry of Dan Wells, but Ortiz got the better of both cars after the pit-stop phase. Spinelli, on the other hand, took over from Brazilian co-driver Claudio Senhoreti - who started further down the field - and produced a typical charging drive in his stint to make up six places and almost claim the win.

Race 2 was a more tense affair, with Spinelli starting fourth overall and Ortiz way down in 19th. As expected, Spinelli held a comfortable advantage in sixth overall, before handing over to Senhoreti at the pit-stops. The Brazilian did well to cling onto the lead but was passed by the Leipert Motorsport car of Dan Wells, who swapped with American Oscar Lee with six minutes remaining.

Charging through the field was Gdovic, who took over from Ortiz at the earliest opportunity. Gdovic closed in on Senhoreti in the closing stages, and made an assertive dive to the inside of Turn 4 to claim second place behind Wells/Lee, thus sealing the title.

Victor Gomez IV, Change Racing

Victor Gomez IV, Change Racing

Photo by: Lamborghini Super Trofeo

Am/Lamborghini Cup

In the Am category, Super Trofeo Europe regular Massimo Ciglia took the early advantage on Saturday evening by winning the opening 50-minute race from pole position. The #27 Oregon Team driver got a superb jump at the start to head Wayne Taylor Racing’s Jordan Missig into Turn 1 for the first time.

Missig had passed VS Racing’s Andrzej Lewandowski of the line and tried to wrestle the lead away from Ciglia as the pair charged towards the fast right-hand kink of Turn 11. Missig then spun across the track, having dropped two wheels on the grass, hitting the barrier hard and forcing him out of the rest of the weekend.

After a safety car intervention, Ciglia maintained his lead either side of the pit window but was under enormous pressure from Gomez in the second stint. With just nine minutes left, Gomez got past Ciglia to take the lead, but Ciglia fought back and dived down the inside of Turn 8 to reclaim the position. From then on, Ciglia was able to build a margin of over three seconds, reduced to 2.6s by the finish following a pit-stop time infringement penalty.

Wayne Taylor Racing’s Ashton Harrison finished third on the road ahead of Lewandowski, but both received five-second penalties for contact with each other during a lively scrap, elevating Leipert Motorsport’s Gabriel Rindone to the final step of the podium.

The second race was a similarly fought encounter at the front, as the top three of Ciglia, Gomez and Rindone leapt away at the start as Harrison again found herself in trouble with a spin at Turn 13 on the opening lap. Rindone led the way but only after shortcutting the second turn as both he, Ciglia and Gomez entered Turn 1 three-abreast.

Rindone was handed a three-second post-race penalty for his actions, but eventually finished in seventh following a spin in the second stint. Ciglia also suffered a spin, just before the pit window closed as he looked to gain time on the new leader Gomez.

This cost the Oregon Team driver valuable time and gave Gomez the lead after pit phase, which he kept until the end. Automobile Tricolore’s Raffaele Giannoni finished second to Gomez and ahead of Ciglia who missed out on the World Finals title by just one point. An impressive recovery drive from Harrison gave her a second successive fourth place finish.

Victor Gomez, (#129 Change Racing): “I’ve always raced in America and never in Europe so I am so excited to be here and competing. The first corner absolutely crazy, I got a great start, got sandwiched and then somebody hit me, so I honestly didn’t know what was going to happen.

“I just kept it cool all race, kept my composure and I am so happy to be the World Finals winner. The team has faced almost every problem with the car this weekend, but they got it done and we’re here with the win!”

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