Verstappen: Miami go-kart chicane not suited for F1 cars

Formula 1 world champion Max Verstappen hopes the Miami Grand Prix's tight chicane will be altered for next year, saying it is not suited to the 2022 breed of cars.

Verstappen: Miami go-kart chicane not suited for F1 cars

The Miami International Autodrome, a temporary facility looping around the Miami Dolphins' Hard Rock Stadium, featured a varied mix of medium to high speed corners, a long straight and a very tight section underneath a turnpike.

The 5.41km layout did not produce a great show, which is partly attributed to the surface's lack of grip off the racing line. Nevertheless, it generally drew modest praise from the drivers, who just singled out the bumpy Turn 14-15 chicane as area for improvement.

Pre-race, the Sector 2 combination was called a Mickey Mouse or Formula E chicane, and afterwards race winner Verstappen hoped it would be addressed for next year's event, saying he almost knocked himself out in practice by bouncing over the high kerbs.

"I think track-wise, we can improve a few areas," Red Bull driver Verstappen said.

"The 14-15 chicane is a bit of a tricky combination. I think if I would have been in a go-kart, it would be a nice chicane to take, but not in an F1 car like we have at the moment.

PLUS: How imperfect Miami offered F1's drivers a unique challenge

"I remember in the four laps I did on Friday, I almost knocked myself out because I hit the first kerb and your head just bounced from left to right at least five, six times, but really bad.

"If you just take it a tiny bit too much, just because it's so long, so wide, so stiff and super heavy that little kerb what it is, it's just not made for it to be honest.

"So, maybe we have to change the kerb layout already, that it's a bit more of a progressive ramp and it looks a bit nicer to go over.

"Maybe that helps already. But yeah, it's so slow and I think our cars look way better if it's a bit more of a flowing combination."

Max Verstappen, Red Bull Racing RB18

Max Verstappen, Red Bull Racing RB18

Photo by: Steven Tee / Motorsport Images

Ferrari's Carlos Sainz, who finished third in Sunday's race, felt that riding the chicane's kerbs right required a bit of luck.

Due to the limited available run-off at the following corner, the Spaniard agreed that a slow chicane was required at that part of the circuit, but said the drivers were already discussing tweaks with F1 to produce a better corner.

"With this generation of cars that are heavy, that are wide, just when you go around those two apex kerbs, it almost feels like you need a bit of luck to get around it," he explained.

"You sometimes get it on a weird angle and the car bounces a lot, then sometimes you nail it and you gain a tenth or two.

"It's a corner that is just a bit unnatural. I think it's still needed because there's not a lot of space there and you need to be quite slow approaching 16 because there's no runoff. So we need something slow, we need something tight.

Insight: 10 things we learned from F1's 2022 Miami GP

"It's just the nature of the two curves there, the way they're put together which is no issue.

"It's a new track that you're always going to go through these phases and we're already in touch with FOM, with Ross [Brawn] and his team to actually sort it out and put together a better piece of circuit."

Sainz' team-mate Charles Leclerc, who started the race from pole but was then overtaken by Verstappen in the first stint, was one of few drivers who said he enjoyed the challenge the unusual chicane provided.

Carlos Sainz, Ferrari F1-75

Carlos Sainz, Ferrari F1-75

Photo by: Jerry Andre / Motorsport Images

Still, he did agree that a layout tweak could benefit the spectacle.

"I think I'm the only driver on the grid that actually liked this chicane - I enjoyed it," he said.

"But on the other hand, I agree that for racing action, I think we can do something better because following wasn't easy on that part.

"Also for visibility it's quite difficult once you have a car in front because you need to be so precise on the kerbs.

"That makes it even more difficult to follow but apart from that I actually quite enjoyed it."

shares
comments
How F1 race leaders have now lost their comfort blanket
Previous article

How F1 race leaders have now lost their comfort blanket

Next article

Ricciardo: Weight saving on drink made Miami F1 race even tougher

Ricciardo: Weight saving on drink made Miami F1 race even tougher
How Tyrrell became a racing Rubik’s cube as it faded out of F1 Plus

How Tyrrell became a racing Rubik’s cube as it faded out of F1

Formula 1’s transformation into a global sport meant the gradual extinction for a small team determined to stay true to its low-budget roots. But Tyrrell would eventually be reborn as a world-beating outfit again, explains MAURICE HAMILTON, albeit in different colours…

Assessing Hamilton's remarkable decade as a Mercedes F1 driver Plus

Assessing Hamilton's remarkable decade as a Mercedes F1 driver

Many doubted Lewis Hamilton’s move from McLaren to Mercedes for the 2013 Formula 1 season. But the journey he’s been on since has taken the Briton to new heights - and to a further six world championship titles

Formula 1
Feb 2, 2023
Why new look Haas is a litmus test for Formula 1’s new era Plus

Why new look Haas is a litmus test for Formula 1’s new era

OPINION: With teams outside the top three having struggled in Formula 1 in recent seasons, the rules changes introduced in 2022 should have more of an impact this season. How well Haas does, as the poster child for the kind of team that F1 wanted to be able to challenge at the front, is crucial

Formula 1
Feb 2, 2023
The Mercedes F1 pressure changes under 10 years of Toto Wolff Plus

The Mercedes F1 pressure changes under 10 years of Toto Wolff

OPINION: Although the central building blocks for Mercedes’ recent, long-lasting Formula 1 success were installed before he joined the team, Toto Wolff has been instrumental in ensuring it maximised its finally-realised potential after years of underachievement. The 10-year anniversary of Wolff joining Mercedes marks the perfect time to assess his work

Formula 1
Feb 1, 2023
The all-French F1 partnership that Ocon and Gasly hope to emulate Plus

The all-French F1 partnership that Ocon and Gasly hope to emulate

Alpine’s signing of Pierre Gasly alongside Esteban Ocon revives memories of a famous all-French line-up, albeit in the red of Ferrari, for BEN EDWARDS. Can the former AlphaTauri man's arrival help the French team on its path back to winning ways in a tribute act to the Prancing Horse's title-winning 1983?

Formula 1
Jan 31, 2023
How do the best races of F1 2022 stack up to 2021? Plus

How do the best races of F1 2022 stack up to 2021?

OPINION: A system to score all the grands prix from the past two seasons produces some interesting results and sets a standard that 2023 should surely exceed

Formula 1
Jan 31, 2023
Who were the fastest drivers in F1 2022? Plus

Who were the fastest drivers in F1 2022?

Who was the fastest driver in 2022? Everyone has an opinion, but what does the stopwatch say? Obviously, differing car performance has an effect on ultimate laptime – but it’s the relative speed of each car/driver package that’s fascinating and enlightening says ALEX KALINAUCKAS

Formula 1
Jan 30, 2023
Why F1's nearly man is refreshed and ready for his return Plus

Why F1's nearly man is refreshed and ready for his return

He has more starts without a podium than anyone else in Formula 1 world championship history, but Nico Hulkenberg is back for one more shot with Haas. After spending three years on the sidelines, the revitalised German is aiming to prove to his new team what the F1 grid has been missing

Formula 1
Jan 29, 2023