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Formula 1 Belgian GP

Norris: Quicker McLaren F1 car still doesn’t suit my driving style

Lando Norris says that the Formula 1 McLaren MCL60 still doesn’t suit his driving style, despite the car’s improved form since a recent package of upgrades.

Lando Norris, McLaren MCL60, leads George Russell, Mercedes F1 W14

The team has made a major step with its car after releasing the first part of its anticipated upgrade package at the Austrian GP. Benefitting from the updates, Norris has subsequently finished second in both the British and Hungarian GPs.

However, Norris insists that the way the car has to be driven still doesn't gel with his personal style, and that the same applies to team-mate Oscar Piastri.

“It's not just my liking, it's also Oscar's because we have pretty similar comments,” said Norris when asked what he needed for the car to suit him. “Same as last year, even when Daniel [Ricciardo] was driving, we had a lot of similar comments, every day, every weekend.

“It's difficult to describe. You have to drive it quite one way. But it's also a way that I don't want to drive, or like to drive.

“I don't like to drive the car the way that I have to drive it now. I feel like it isn't to my strengths at all.

"I want to be able to carry minimum speed and to 'U' a corner. And the last thing I can do in the world now is 'U' a corner. I have to 'V' the corner more than ever, and I've never been the biggest fan of doing that. And I don't like it that much.”

Lando Norris, McLaren MCL60

Lando Norris, McLaren MCL60

Photo by: Erik Junius

Expanding on the strengths of the current package Norris said that braking is a strength of the car.

“Basically, the car only likes to go in a straight line,” he said. “I mean, it doesn't even go very quick in a straight line either!

“But we're very good under braking, in straight line braking, which is why we were so quick in the wet at times. I wouldn't say we're quick in the wet as a general note, we're quick in the wet when braking is a big key, like in Monaco. It builds tyre temperature, builds confidence.

“That’s when we’re quick, but we're not actually quick in the corners when it's wet. So there's certain things which allow us to be competitive.

"But it's just to be able to have scope to do different lines, and drive in different ways. If the wind changes, if conditions change, different fuel loads, tyre degradation, we still always have to drive in one specific way.

“And it's not a way that I currently like, it's one that I've had to adapt to. I still have to adapt a lot as a driver, and it's far away from the car that I want to be able to drive.”

Norris noted that slow-speed corners are not a strength of the car while acknowledging that other teams have similar issues.

“I don't think it's specifically [us], because a lot of comments I know that other people have are the same in a way," he said.

“But we're one of the slowest cars in the slow speed corners, and it's also for these reasons, it's just they're not quite as bad. It's just an area that's been bad for us over the last five years that we've not really tackled that well. And at no point have we gone, ‘Wow, the slow speed's strong, now let's work on the high speed.’

“It's always been good in high speed, poor in slow speed. But as a general point with these tyres, just how you have to drive them, it's very difficult to combine. They only like to go almost in a straight line at any point, they don't like to corner.

“So you kind of have to make the car a little bit around this, but the better you make the car, the less stress you can put on the tyres and things like that.”

Lando Norris, McLaren, in Parc Ferme after the Sprint

Lando Norris, McLaren, in Parc Ferme after the Sprint

Photo by: Sam Bloxham / Motorsport Images

Asked about how the issue can be addressed he said: “I guess it's aerodynamics, we still have a focus of it. But at the same time it's a handling characteristic, which I would say is not all to do with aerodynamics. Even though aerodynamics is the easiest to just add load to, and it's an easy way of just bringing absolute performance.

“I think even if we say we had the same load as a Red Bull in slow speed, I don't think we have the right balance of car in slow speed, which I think is also a limitation for us.

“I don't think it's just about looking at aerodynamically how we perform, but also mechanically and tying everything together and coming up with little tricks and things that some other teams have, to accelerate low speed performance.”

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