New post-qualifying rules set

The sport's governing body, the FIA, has outlined the new post-qualifying parc ferme procedures, including details on what work teams are permitted to carry out on the cars

New post-qualifying rules set

Once a car has completed its final qualifying run on Saturday it will be required to stop in the weighing area and then moved to the FIA central parc ferme. Whilst the cars are being held in parc ferme, two members from each team will be allowed in to check tyre pressures, connect a jump battery and water heaters and download data by physical connection to the car. They will also be allowed to change tyres on the car, with the tyres used for qualifying being marked and sealed by an FIA scrutineer. These tyres must be fitted for the start of the race.

The cars will then be released to teams, who will push them back to their garages. From this point teams will be able to carry out limited work, under the supervision of FIA scrutineers. The team may remove wheels and any parts genuinely necessary to carry out essential safety checks. Engines can be started and, with the exception of fuel, fluids may be drained from the car. The team can also access on board electrical units.

At 1800 on Saturday, each team must return the cars to parc ferme, with all the parts used for qualifying refitted, other than tyres. The cars may be covered but no team personnel will be permitted into parc ferme unless specifically authorised.

At 0800 on Sunday, the cars will be returned to the teams who are then permitted to carry out further limited work. The teams may repair bona fide accident damage, start the engine, change the battery and replenish any fluids other than fuel. The FIA reserves the right to randomly weigh cars in the hour preceding the pit lane opening, and the weight of the car must be within 3kg of its weight at the completion of qualifying.

The car can complete reconnaissance laps, but must do so with its qualifying tyres fitted. If one or more tyre is damaged, they may be replaced by other tyres that have already been used for a greater number of laps.

If Saturday qualifying is wet and the race is dry (or vice versa), the team is permitted to change tyres and its brake cooling ducts. If the FIA technical delegate is satisfied that changes to the climactic conditions necessitate alterations to the car, these may also be carried out.

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