Subscribe

Sign up for free

  • Get quick access to your favorite articles

  • Manage alerts on breaking news and favorite drivers

  • Make your voice heard with article commenting.

Autosport Plus

Discover premium content
Subscribe
Formula 1 Mexico City GP

Mexican GP: F1 tech images from the pitlane explained

Join us as we delve into the Formula 1 technical features on display in the pitlane as teams prepare for the Mexican Grand Prix, courtesy of Giorgio Piola and Sutton Images.

Mercedes F1 W14 technical detail

Giorgio Piola's F1 technical analysis

Giorgio Piola is the preeminent Formula 1 technical journalist. Born in Genoa, Italy, Giorgio has covered the F1 World Championship since 1969, producing thousands of illustrations that have been reproduced in the world’s most prestigious motor racing publications.


Ferrari SF-23 detail

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

Ferrari SF-23 detail

Ferrari has opted for more cooling at the Mexican Grand Prix, as the rarified air at the circuit's altitude means teams are less concerned about the ill effects running so much cooling might have on the aerodynamic output.


Alfa Romeo C43 technical detail

Photo by: Uncredited

Alfa Romeo C43 technical detail

A look under the skin of the Alfa Romeo C43 without the nose and vanity panel fitted allows us to see some of the inboard front suspension elements and the brake cylinders. Without the outer brake drums in position we’re also able to see the front brake disc fairing employed by the team.


McLaren MCL60 technical detail

Photo by: Uncredited

McLaren MCL60 technical detail

McLaren looks set to employ a high downforce rear wing and beam wing layout from the suite of options at their disposal, which also includes an open-ended endplate and tip section solution. Note also the placement of a kiel probe array in the central portion of the wing that the team will use to collect data during FP1.


McLaren MCL60 technical detail

Photo by: Uncredited

McLaren MCL60 technical detail

It’s a high downforce option on the menu at the front of the car too, as a full-span Gurney can be found on the trailing edge of the MCL60’s front wing.


McLaren MCL60 technical detail

Photo by: Uncredited

McLaren MCL60 technical detail

A huge front brake duct inlet has been selected by McLaren too, with room having to be made in the sidewall of the scoop to accommodate the pull-rod suspension that intersects it.


Alpine A523 technical detail

Photo by: Uncredited

Alpine A523 technical detail

A good view of the Alpine A523 as it’s being prepared by the mechanics, with an interesting layout for its internal front brake duct fairings, which already appear to show signs of heat exhaustion. Also note the internal makeup of the bib and its sprung support system.


Alpine A523 technical detail

Photo by: Uncredited

Alpine A523 technical detail

Alpine also has a few front wings available, all of which feature the wavy trailing edge on the upper flap. In the foreground the wing has a bare trailing edge and small Gurney on the innermost section of the upper flap, while the lower one in the background does not.


Mercedes F1 W14 technical detail

Photo by: Uncredited

Mercedes F1 W14 technical detail

The front wing on the Mercedes W14 also has a Gurney in the central, moveable section of the upper flap.


Mercedes F1 W14 technical detail

Photo by: Uncredited

Mercedes F1 W14 technical detail

It’s a high downforce rear wing configuration for Mercedes in Mexico, as you’d expect, with the team employing its version of the open-ended endplate tip section. Also note the heat tape that’s been added to the front and rear brake drums.


Ferrari SF-23 technical detail

Photo by: Uncredited

Ferrari SF-23 technical detail

Ferrari has a high downforce rear wing offering, complete with Gurney on the trailing edge of the upper flap. It continues to employ the more conventional tip section, unlike rivals, with an open-ended variant appearing just once so far this season, at the Belgian GP.


Ferrari SF-23 technical detail

Photo by: Uncredited

Ferrari SF-23 technical detail

The rear crash structure, rear brakes and rear suspension of the Ferrari SF-23, with the upper wishbone mounted high, on top of the assembly.


Red Bull Racing RB19 technical detail

Photo by: Uncredited

Red Bull Racing RB19 technical detail

Red Bull’s high downforce rear wing arrangement includes an open-ended endplate and tip section solution, and while there’s a Gurney on the trailing edge of the upper flap, there’s also a V-shaped notch in the central section to help reduce drag. Also note how displaced the rear brake ducts fence is from the drum in order to capture cool air, which is then divisible by the vanes mounted on the fence.


Ferrari SF-23 technical detail

Photo by: Uncredited

Ferrari SF-23 technical detail

A look at the chassis, outer floor fence and leading edge of the floor on the Ferrari SF-23, with the dipped profile of the chassis a notable feature that allows the lower rear of the wishbone to be slung lower.


Ferrari SF-23 detail

Photo by: Giorgio Piola

Ferrari SF-23 detail

The front brake assembly on the SF-23 without the brake disc fairing in place allows us to see the drilling pattern being employed.


Be part of the Autosport community

Join the conversation
Previous article Friday favourite: The sweet-handling Toyota epilogue to its F1 adventure
Next article Alonso: "Football" mentality not right way to judge Aston Martin's F1 season

Top Comments

There are no comments at the moment. Would you like to write one?

Sign up for free

  • Get quick access to your favorite articles

  • Manage alerts on breaking news and favorite drivers

  • Make your voice heard with article commenting.

Autosport Plus

Discover premium content
Subscribe