Subscribe

Sign up for free

  • Get quick access to your favorite articles

  • Manage alerts on breaking news and favorite drivers

  • Make your voice heard with article commenting.

Autosport Plus

Discover premium content
Subscribe

Formula 1's small teams push for 'core car' plan

Formula 1's smaller outfits are pushing to be allowed to share more car parts in the future in a bid to help lower costs

Despite complaints last year from Force India, Sauber and Lotus that spiralling budgets threatened their survival, F1's chiefs have done very little to help the situation.

With no concessions given to increasing prize money, and major cost cutting ideas blocked by the top squads, the smaller teams have now got together to pursue an alternative path.

They want to create the idea of a 'core car' - where major components such as the monocoque are jointly developed and shared between them.

DIETER RENCKEN: 'Core car' could be the answer for F1

The pooling of resources would help lower their costs, while being allowed to individually develop items such as wings and other bodywork would ensure that each team had a different looking car.

The 'core car' plan has been discussed at recent strategy group and F1 commission meetings, but has not gathered enough support from the bigger teams to be given the green light.

AUTOSPORT understands that one of the reasons for the large teams' opposition was that F1 rules already allow a significant degree of car technology sharing - so it was felt unnecessary to expand it any further.

It is the basis of sharing common parts that is helping Haas make the move into F1, having agreed a technical partnership with Ferrari.

Despite the resistance of the big teams, it is understood that the small outfits are continuing to lobby the FIA and F1 supremo Bernie Ecclestone to be given the chance to introduce the idea.

They insist that if the 'core car' gets the go ahead it would help cut costs dramatically, and ensure the survival of all the current teams.

Be part of Autosport community

Join the conversation
Previous article FIA to investigate Fernando Alonso's McLaren Formula 1 test crash
Next article 'Core car' idea could be F1's saviour

Top Comments

There are no comments at the moment. Would you like to write one?

Sign up for free

  • Get quick access to your favorite articles

  • Manage alerts on breaking news and favorite drivers

  • Make your voice heard with article commenting.

Autosport Plus

Discover premium content
Subscribe