Subscribe

Sign up for free

  • Get quick access to your favorite articles

  • Manage alerts on breaking news and favorite drivers

  • Make your voice heard with article commenting.

Autosport Plus

Discover premium content
Subscribe
Formula 1 Brazilian GP

Brazilian GP: F1 tech images from the pitlane explained

Join us as we delve into the Formula 1 technical features on display in the pitlane as teams prepare for the Brazilian Grand Prix, courtesy of Giorgio Piola and Sutton Images.

Ferrari SF-23 detail

Giorgio Piola's F1 technical analysis

Giorgio Piola is the preeminent Formula 1 technical journalist. Born in Genoa, Italy, Giorgio has covered the F1 World Championship since 1969, producing thousands of illustrations that have been reproduced in the world’s most prestigious motor racing publications.

A close-up of the front brake duct on the Red Bull RB19, with the upper fairing wrapped around the disc, whilst the lower fairing takes care of cooling the caliper.

Red Bull Racing RB19 detail

Photo by: Uncredited

Red Bull Racing RB19 detail

Now with the outer drum in place, our focus shifts to the inlet which straddles either side of the end fence and collects air on both sides.

Ferrari SF-23 detail

Photo by: Uncredited

Ferrari SF-23 detail

A close-up of Ferrari's front wing. Note the five outwashing slot gap separator brackets and the Gurney flap which spans the width of the moveable section of the upper flap.

Mercedes W14 detail

Photo by: Uncredited

Mercedes W14 detail

Mercedes with a row of front wings and nosecones prepared outside its garage, with the different downforce levels readied.

Alpine A523 detail

Photo by: Uncredited

Alpine A523 detail

Alpine with a high downforce variant rear wing prepared, which features its open-ended tip section solution.

Alpine A523 detail

Photo by: Uncredited

Alpine A523 detail

Meanwhile, Alpine's wavy trailing edge front wing upper flap is once again present in Brazil.

McLaren MCL60 detail

Photo by: Uncredited

McLaren MCL60 detail

A look at the pipework used by McLaren as part of its front brake duct arrangement, with separate channels used to deliver cool air to the various components.

McLaren MCL60 detail

Photo by: Uncredited

McLaren MCL60 detail

The MCL60's rear end is detached from the power unit, which provides us with a unique view of its rear brake duct arrangement prior to the outer drum being installed.

Alfa Romeo Racing C43 detail

Photo by: Uncredited

Alfa Romeo Racing C43 detail

A top-down overview of the Alfa Romeo C43's front wing and nose gives a clear indication of how each of the flaps is distributed across their span.

McLaren MCL60 detail

Photo by: Uncredited

McLaren MCL60 detail

McLaren has two open-ended tip section solutions in its suite of rear wing options, this one having a less tightly wound geometry.

Mercedes W14 detail

Photo by: Uncredited

Mercedes W14 detail

Mercedes' higher downforce rear wing variant, which features its take on the open-ended tip section, has also been fitted with tufts in order that it can monitor the wing's behaviour during FP1.

Ferrari SF-23 detail

Photo by: Uncredited

Ferrari SF-23 detail

A great view of the rear crash structure and suspension of the Ferrari SF-23 as it is stood up on its end in the back of the garage.

Red Bull Racing RB19 detail

Photo by: Uncredited

Red Bull Racing RB19 detail

A close-up of the open-ended tip section solution on the Red Bull RB19 that the team first introduced at the Singapore Grand Prix.

Red Bull Racing RB19 detail

Photo by: Uncredited

Red Bull Racing RB19 detail

A close-up of the floor edge on the RB19, with the more expansive edge wing design that the team introduced in Singapore but did not race until the Japanese Grand Prix.

Mercedes W14 detail

Photo by: Uncredited

Mercedes W14 detail

An overview of the Mercedes W14's rear end, including its rear wing, beam wing, engine cover cooling outlet, brake duct winglets and the diffuser, with a note on the fluted upper corner design.

Mercedes W14 detail

Photo by: Uncredited

Mercedes W14 detail

A close-up of the rear brake duct outlet and the winglet mounted beside it on the Mercedes W14.

Mercedes W14 detail

Photo by: Uncredited

Mercedes W14 detail

Extreme close-up of the forward section of the floor's edge, which is rolled up and includes a row of mini vortex generators. Also note the perforation between the floor edge and the Gurney above it, which also has notches carved out that fall in line with the fence strakes below.

Mercedes W14 detail

Photo by: Uncredited

Mercedes W14 detail

The forward section of the edge wing is also rolled up and sports two angled vanes that will coerce the airflow's direction thereafter.

Mercedes W14 detail

Photo by: Uncredited

Mercedes W14 detail

A close-up of the open-ended tip section on the Mercedes W14's rear wing, which is folded over at the wing's boundary, while a metal fillet helps to limit flexion.

Mercedes W14 detail

Photo by: Uncredited

Mercedes W14 detail

A look at the rear of the W14's steering wheel, with the upper paddles used for gear shifts, while the lower, wishbone-style paddle is used to modulate the clutch.

Mercedes W14 detail

Photo by: Uncredited

Mercedes W14 detail

A close-up of the floor's leading edge, the floor fences, the outwardly angled chassis vane and the SIS fairing, with its accompanying feather-like drop-down vane.

Be part of the Autosport community

Join the conversation
Previous article F1 revenues up by 24% on 2022 in third quarter
Next article Tsunoda explains why Ricciardo is more heavily linked with Red Bull F1 switch

Top Comments

Sign up for free

  • Get quick access to your favorite articles

  • Manage alerts on breaking news and favorite drivers

  • Make your voice heard with article commenting.

Autosport Plus

Discover premium content
Subscribe