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Quartararo: Current Yamaha “practically the same” as Lorenzo’s 2015 MotoGP bike

Fabio Quartararo has said the current Yamaha MotoGP challenger is “practically the same” as the bike Jorge Lorenzo raced to the title in 2015, highlighting the marque’s lack of evolution.

Fabio Quartararo, Yamaha Factory Racing

Yamaha currently sits joint-last in the manufacturers’ table with Honda in what has been an abysmal year for the Japanese brands in MotoGP.

Quartararo, who won three races in 2022 and was runner-up in the standings, has just two podiums to his credit: a third at the Americas Grand Prix and a third in the sprint at Assen following a penalty for Brad Binder.

The 2021 world champion has repeatedly aired his frustrations at Yamaha’s lack of competitiveness.

Recently, he told Autosport’s Spanish language sister website es.motorsport.com that his future with Yamaha hinges on the bike it brings to the Misano test next month.

In the same interview, Quartararo highlighted just how little Yamaha has evolved its M1.

“I think that Ducati, KTM and Aprilia risk much more than the Japanese factories,” Quartararo said.

“The differences between the KTM, Ducati and Aprilia of five years ago, compared to the current ones, are huge.

“Our bike is the same. I saw my 2021 world championship bike and next to it was Lorenzo’s from 2015.

“They are practically the same: almost nothing has changed. That is very rare after six years.”

Fabio Quartararo, Yamaha Factory Racing

Fabio Quartararo, Yamaha Factory Racing

Photo by: Gold and Goose / Motorsport Images

Quartararo also notes that the lack of development in the Yamaha is more apparent now given how much bikes have evolved since he made his debut in 2019.

While aerodynamic fairings were still being used, their development has accelerated in recent years. There has also been the advent of ride-height devices.

“I don’t have as much experience as other riders, but the world championship has gone from white to black in the four years I’ve been here.

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“In 2019, when I debuted, for the start I only had to activate the start control. Now you have to do a thousand manoeuvres: brake to activate the height devices, front and rear; look at all the controls and so on.

“The evolution of the bike is huge, but the other brands risk much more than us.”

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