Williams F1 team thinks it can solve 'catastrophic' wing anomaly

The Williams Formula 1 team is certain it can solve the "really quite catastrophic" problem of aerodynamic stalls generated by the new rear wing it tried to introduce at Silverstone

Williams F1 team thinks it can solve 'catastrophic' wing anomaly

Both Williams drivers went off in British Grand Prix qualifying after the new wing created an aerodynamic stall at the diffuser when DRS was opened and then shut again.

Williams changed the wings on both cars, prompting pitlane starts for Lance Stroll and Sergey Sirotkin, and is evaluating the new spec this week to try to find the cause.

Chief technical officer Paddy Lowe described the problem as "intermittent, but really quite catastrophic".

He said: "In that situation it's really such an extreme loss of downforce, that it is not really safe.

"Of course we could consider racing without using any DRS, but that is not a way to compete."

Asked if the team would endeavour to use the wing in the future, Lowe added: "Yeah, I am sure there is a way through this, that we just need to understand.

"I don't think there is anything sort of fundamentally wrong with this rear wing.

"It is something in the way everything has been put together, it is a combination, that is causing some strange phenomenon.

"We don't have the answer right now, no. We want to do some more evaluations."

Lowe said starting with both cars in the pitlane was "a new experience I hope to not ever have to repeat".

The rear wing is part of a recovery programme put in place after Williams's difficult start to the year.

Lowe said it would "not really" affect that development plan and would actually offer a better insight into what it is doing and what can be improved.

"Correlation is a never-ending project," he added. "The reason you see teams running rakes all the times, it is just a constant effort to improve the correlation between the tools back at base and the cars really running on tracks.

"You may learn things now that should mostly be relevant also for next year."

Lowe said the rear wing is Williams's maximum-downforce solution that is designed to be more effective at the Hungaroring and in Singapore but was "still slightly better" for circuits such as Silverstone.

He pledged more updates would emerge in Germany and Hungary but would not "promise any particular outcome" or detail what the developments would be.

shares
comments
Red Bull-Honda F1 decision logic Daniel Ricciardo's main 2019 doubt

Previous article

Red Bull-Honda F1 decision logic Daniel Ricciardo's main 2019 doubt

Next article

Formula 1 charity Starcards auction for Great Ormond Street

Formula 1 charity Starcards auction for Great Ormond Street
Load comments

About this article

Series Formula 1
Teams Williams
Author Oleg Karpov
Why Tsunoda can become Japan’s greatest F1 talent Plus

Why Tsunoda can become Japan’s greatest F1 talent

While Japan's fever for motor racing is well-documented, the country has yet to produce a Formula 1 superstar – but that could be about to change, says BEN EDWARDS

Why the demise of F1's hypocritical spending habit is cause for celebration Plus

Why the demise of F1's hypocritical spending habit is cause for celebration

For too long, F1's richest teams have justified being able to spend as much as they want because that's the way they've always conducted their business. STUART CODLING says that's no reason not to kick a bad habit

Formula 1
Apr 14, 2021
The double whammy that is defining Vettel’s F1 fate Plus

The double whammy that is defining Vettel’s F1 fate

It's been a tough start to Sebastian Vettel's Aston Martin F1 career, with a lack of pre-season testing mileage followed by an incident-packed Bahrain GP. But two key underlying factors mean a turnaround is not guaranteed

Formula 1
Apr 14, 2021
The diva that stole a march on F1’s wide-bodied opposition Plus

The diva that stole a march on F1’s wide-bodied opposition

In 2017 new F1 technical regulations were supposed to add drama - and peg Mercedes back. STUART CODLING looks at the car which, while troubled, set the stage for the wide-bodied Formula 1 era

Formula 1
Apr 13, 2021
The themes to watch in F1’s Imola return Plus

The themes to watch in F1’s Imola return

Three weeks is a long time in Formula 1, but in the reshaped start to the 2021 season the teams head to Imola to pick things up after the frenetic Bahrain opener. Here's what to look out for and the developments to follow at the Emilia Romagna Grand Prix

Formula 1
Apr 13, 2021
The 'new' F1 drivers who need to improve at Imola Plus

The 'new' F1 drivers who need to improve at Imola

After a pandemic-hit winter of seat-swapping, F1 kicked off its season with several new faces in town, other drivers adapting to new environments, and one making a much-anticipated comeback. BEN ANDERSON looks at who made the most of their opportunity and who needs to try harder…

Formula 1
Apr 12, 2021
The delay that quashed Aston Martin’s last F1 venture Plus

The delay that quashed Aston Martin’s last F1 venture

Aston Martin’s only previous foray into Formula 1 in the late 1950s was a short-lived and unsuccessful affair. But it could have been so different, says NIGEL ROEBUCK

Formula 1
Apr 10, 2021
Verstappen exclusive: Why lack of car-racing titles won't hurt Red Bull's ace Plus

Verstappen exclusive: Why lack of car-racing titles won't hurt Red Bull's ace

Max Verstappen’s star quality in Formula 1 is clear. Now equipped with a Red Bull car that is, right now, the world title favourite and the experience to support his talent, could 2021 be the Dutchman’s year to topple the dominant force of Lewis Hamilton and Mercedes?

Formula 1
Apr 9, 2021