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Pierre Gasly, Alpine A524
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Special feature

The secrets of F1 turbocharging explained

PAT SYMONDS delves into the use of turbos in F1, from Renault’s foray into turbocharged engines in 1977 up to the current hybrid turbos

Turbocharged engines are now de rigueur as the industry adopts engine downsizing to increase efficiency. While they are thought of as a relatively new development, the first patent for such a device was granted in 1905.

Although the idea was sound, the materials available to engineers at the time weren’t suitable for such arduous conditions, and while a Liberty aero engine was turbocharged in 1918, it wasn’t until the 1950s that the first production turbo-diesel engine went into production. This was followed in 1962 by a pair of turbocharged petrol General Motors models (albeit running very low boost): the Chevrolet Corvair Monza and Oldsmobile F-85 Jetfire. Poor reliability led to them going out of production within two years.

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