Silverstone open to running multiple F1 races, reverse layout

Silverstone is open to hosting multiple Formula 1 races in 2020 to help the championship and could consider using a reverse layout of its grand prix circuit

Silverstone open to running multiple F1 races, reverse layout

As the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic continues to impact global sport, F1 bosses are continuing to evaluate the current calendar that has already lost its first eight races.

Silverstone confirmed on Wednesday it had until the end of April to make a decision on the running of the British Grand Prix, scheduled for July 19.

A number of scenarios are being considered by F1 officials to bolster the 2020 schedule once racing came resume, including an extension to the season into next year, while the idea of running multiple races at the same track has also been suggested.

Speaking to Sky Sports News, Silverstone managing director Stuart Pringle said the track was willing to do whatever was needed to assist F1, including hosting more than one race.

"All I've done is say to Formula 1 we are willing to work with them in any way, shape or form that they think is in the best interest of the championship," Pringle said.

"The majority of the teams are within a stone's throw of the circuit, so operationally, it would be pretty straightforward [to host multiple races].

"We've got fixed infrastructure, the staff could go home to their own beds in an evening for the large part.

"If that's how we can help then I'm very pleased, I'd be delighted to do that. We'll do whatever's asked of us."

Asked if there was any consideration of running the 5.891km track in reverse for a second event, Pringle said that while Silverstone was not currently licensed to do so, it could not be ruled out.

"It's not such a silly thought," Pringle said.

"We're not licensed to run the other way, but these are extraordinary times, and I guess that extraordinary decisions are being made.

"Nothing's off the table, but equally, let's see what the next four weeks look like.

"It's difficult for Formula 1, they're not just looking at what's going on in Great Britain, they're looking at what's going on around the world and how their travel arrangements have to fit in.

"It's perhaps not such a crazy question."

A number of major sporting events scheduled for the summer have already been cancelled, including the Wimbledon tennis championships, which were due to conclude just one week before the British Grand Prix.

Pringle explained that Silverstone was able to take more time on its decision, meaning it could fully evaluate the situation before making a call on the race.

"Silverstone is one round in a world championship, and our colleagues at Formula 1 are working incredibly hard to try and piece together a season that would start much later," Pringle said.

"There have been a number of cancellations and postponements, so they're trying to re-knit that calendar together and we are one element of that.

"It's important that Formula 1 try and get a world championship season away, so we can give them the time they need to do that.

"We're a fixed venue, we've got a fixed setup and infrastructure. We've also got an incredibly experienced team, they know what they are doing.

"So we can allow ourselves the month of April to make a decision which is sufficient for Formula 1 I hope to get their plans together."

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