Renault boss Abiteboul predicts F1 could become energy battleground

Formula 1 could become an energy battleground in the future that will keep it at the cutting edge of technology, according to Renault team boss Cyril Abiteboul

Renault boss Abiteboul predicts F1 could become energy battleground

As discussions start about the framing of new hybrid engines rules from 2026 at the latest, there has been an increased focus on how best F1 can remain attractive to fans and manufacturers.

The new regulations will offer the chance for F1 to map out potential new technologies in engine development, fuels and batteries.

One of the key directions F1 wants to take is in being at the forefront of sustainable fuel development, which it believes could bring huge benefits to the environment while a majority of road cars continue to run with internal combustion engines.

For Abiteboul, whose Renault bosses are fully recommitted to F1 beyond the team's rebranding as Alpine in 2021, the possibilities for the sport over the next few years are hugely exciting.

PLUS: Why Renault's new 'car guy' CEO couldn't pull plug on F1

"I think that there is a very interesting sort of area that is going to open for energy development," explained Abiteboul.

"I think Formula 1 will become a sport all about energy, what type of fuel do we want, what type of battery do we want to use also.

"I see that these things will be very important in terms of breakthrough for the industry and in my opinion, Formula 1 has a great role to play, to lead the way in that respect.

"Clearly these things will have an impact, not just on the sport and not just on the automotive [market], but frankly on a very large scale."

F1 has already developed a second generation biofuel that has been sent to the current manufacturers for testing to check its suitability for future engines.

FIA president Jean Todt thinks it is essential that motor racing's governing body does all it can to ensure F1 remains sustainable amid a growing awareness about environmental concerns.

"You take all the member states, they're talking about climate change, about environment," he said.

"We as a regulator and legislator around motorsport around the world, and also as the biggest road user organisation around the world, it's absolutely essential that we speak about sustainability, about environment, about pollution."

shares
comments
Who were the saints and sinners of F1’s 2020 penalty points system?

Previous article

Who were the saints and sinners of F1’s 2020 penalty points system?

Next article

The five best race drives of F1 2020

The five best race drives of F1 2020
Load comments

About this article

Series Formula 1
Teams Renault F1 Team
Author Jonathan Noble
The 'new' F1 drivers who need to improve at Imola Plus

The 'new' F1 drivers who need to improve at Imola

After a pandemic-hit winter of seat-swapping, F1 kicked off its season with several new faces in town, other drivers adapting to new environments, and one making a much-anticipated comeback. BEN ANDERSON looks at who made the most of their opportunity and who needs to try harder…

The delay that quashed Aston Martin’s last F1 venture Plus

The delay that quashed Aston Martin’s last F1 venture

Aston Martin’s only previous foray into Formula 1 in the late 1950s was a short-lived and unsuccessful affair. But it could have been so different, says NIGEL ROEBUCK

Formula 1
Apr 10, 2021
Verstappen exclusive: Why lack of car-racing titles won't hurt Red Bull's ace Plus

Verstappen exclusive: Why lack of car-racing titles won't hurt Red Bull's ace

Max Verstappen’s star quality in Formula 1 is clear. Now equipped with a Red Bull car that is, right now, the world title favourite and the experience to support his talent, could 2021 be the Dutchman’s year to topple the dominant force of Lewis Hamilton and Mercedes?

Formula 1
Apr 9, 2021
Are we at peak F1 right now? Plus

Are we at peak F1 right now?

For many, many years Formula 1 has strived to do and to be better on all fronts. With close competition, a growing fanbase, a stable political landscape and rules in place to encourage sustainability, 2021 is on course to provide an unexpected peak

Formula 1
Apr 8, 2021
How crucial marginal calls will decide the Red Bull vs Mercedes battle in F1 2021 Plus

How crucial marginal calls will decide the Red Bull vs Mercedes battle in F1 2021

The longer Red Bull can maintain a performance edge over Mercedes, the better the odds will be in the team’s favour against the defending world champions. But as the Bahrain Grand Prix showed, many more factors will be critical in the outcome of the 2021 Formula 1 World Championship

Formula 1
Apr 7, 2021
How Williams’ new structure adheres to a growing F1 trend Plus

How Williams’ new structure adheres to a growing F1 trend

Williams held out against the tide for many years but, as MARK GALLAGHER explains, the age of the owner-manager is long gone

Formula 1
Apr 6, 2021
When a journeyman driver's F1 career lasted just 800m Plus

When a journeyman driver's F1 career lasted just 800m

Nikita Mazepin’s Formula 1 debut at the Bahrain Grand Prix lasted mere corners before he wiped himself out in a shunt, but his financial backing affords him a full season. Back in 1993 though, Marco Apicella was an F1 driver for just 800m before a first corner fracas ended his career. Here’s the story of his very short time at motorsport’s pinnacle

Formula 1
Apr 4, 2021
The nightmare timing that now hinders Mercedes Plus

The nightmare timing that now hinders Mercedes

Mercedes and Lewis Hamilton took victory at the Bahrain Grand Prix despite, for a change, not having the quickest car. But any hopes of developing its W12 to surpass Red Bull's RB16B in terms of outright speed could not have come at a worse time.

Formula 1
Apr 2, 2021