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Red Bull insists it won't write off 2014 F1 car

Red Bull says there is no point in it stopping development of this year's Formula 1 car in favour of focusing on its 2015 design

With Mercedes' current dominance making it almost certain that Red Bull will, for the first time since 2009, not win the F1 title, the Milton Keynes-based outfit could have been tempted to get a headstart on next season's car.

But team principal Christian Horner thinks the fact that there are only minor rule changes for 2015 means that there is very little to be gained by stopping work on the current car.

"I can't speak for other teams but this team will fight all the way to Abu Dhabi," he explained.

"Everything we learn this year has a relevance for next year. We don't give up on anything.

"Every race weekend is an opportunity, and I think Mercedes have got to do something pretty catastrophic to lose this championship.

"But we've got nine further opportunities to develop the car and learn from the car before next year where the rules are pretty stable."

SUMMER STEP UNLIKELY

Red Bull has traditionally been impressive in making big strides over the second half of the campaign due to an aggressive development programme.

However, Horner thinks such progress is unlikely this season because he believes its car is already at a high level while its weakness remains its Renault engine.

"I think it is difficult because the chassis, we can see was very strong in the first sector in Germany and in the third sector we were right there. The damage was in the middle sector.

"We had a very small improvement with the fuel but we need a bigger step, and that is what we are desperate for."

POSITIVE RENAULT SIGNS

Despite a clear frustration at the job Renault has done, Horner says the initial feedback from recent management changes at the French car manufacturer's F1 project are encouraging.

"The changes in management there are much more positive," he explained.

"They are much more involved, and they are embracing the fact that there is an issue, and looking to make changes to make sure we start to close that gap to Mercedes.

"Of course it will take a little bit of time, but the right attitude is there now to start to make that progress."

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