FIA probing Ferrari F1 car spec amid tyre test questions

The FIA is seeking clarity from Ferrari about the specification of Formula 1 car parts it ran at the recent Imola tyre test, following legality questions from rival teams.

FIA probing Ferrari F1 car spec amid tyre test questions

Ferrari was one of four teams that took part in a two-day tyre test after the Emilia Romagna Grand Prix to help development work for Pirelli's 2023 rubber.

But it has emerged that rivals have questioned whether Ferrari fully complied with the regulations with the way it elected to run with different floor specifications during its one day of testing.

The team ran Charles Leclerc on the Wednesday morning, and Carlos Sainz that afternoon, with images showing the two drivers running with different specifications of floor.

F1's tyre test rules are quite strict in limiting what teams are allowed to run, and rivals have been alerted by the fact that Sainz's F1-75 appeared to be fitted with a new specification of floor (below).

A recently revised Article 10.8 of F1's Sporting Regulations lays out the requirements for teams regarding what parts they can use, and outlaws teams from running new experimental parts.

The rules state: "Cars at these tests must only use components of a specification that have been used in at least one (1) race or TCC [testing of current cars] during the current Championship year. These cars must fully comply with the provisions of the Technical Regulations."

It adds: "No test parts, component changes or set-up changes will be permitted which give any sort of information to the Competitor that is unrelated to the tyre test.

"Mechanical set-up changes, driver control changes and component changes are permitted if agreed in advance with the tyre supplier that they are necessary for the correct evaluation of the tyres or to complete the tyre test."

Carlos Sainz, Ferrari F1-75, floor detail

Carlos Sainz, Ferrari F1-75, floor detail

Photo by: Davide Cavazza

It is understood that the issue over the Imola test revolves around the specification of floor that was run in the afternoon.

While Leclerc's floor is understood to be the version that was raced at the Bahrain Grand Prix, there is uncertainty about whether or not the Sainz floor had been put into action before.

Read Also:

To comply with the regulations, Ferrari would have needed to run components at one of the two pre-season tests if it had not been raced.

One aspect that may come into play, however is exactly what the definition of 'components' in the rules actually means when it comes to tweaked designs.

Ferrari has declined to reveal the full details about where and when the Sainz floor had run before, but the team is adamant that it fully complied with the regulations and is completely relaxed about the situation.

Autosport understands that at least two teams have communicated with the FIA to check on the legality of what Ferrari did, but others are taking a close look into the matter.

Sources have indicated that the governing body is now in dialogue with Ferrari to enquire about what it ran at the test to ensure that the rules were fully complied with.

Ferrari's actions at the test come during a period when teams are pushing hard to develop their floors to try to dial out porpoising.

The new Ferrari floor that is at the centre of the debate features a revised edge, discarding the McLaren-style edge wing it appropriated earlier in the season.

It also features a strake mounted beneath the floor in a similar fashion to the Red Bull that has been viewed as a key component to help prevent the cars bouncing.

shares
comments

Related video

From Vice to F1: The story of Miami's other grands prix
Previous article

From Vice to F1: The story of Miami's other grands prix

Next article

Hamilton: FIA clampdown on F1 drivers wearing jewellery "a step backwards"

Hamilton: FIA clampdown on F1 drivers wearing jewellery "a step backwards"
The time-honoured manufacturer model that can't apply to all F1 teams Plus

The time-honoured manufacturer model that can't apply to all F1 teams

What happens, asks MATT KEW, if the old adage of win on a Sunday, sell on a Monday is no longer true for F1 manufacturers?

Why is Oscar Piastri F1's most sought-after rookie? Plus

Why is Oscar Piastri F1's most sought-after rookie?

The Australian rising star is fast, consistent, confident, adaptable and has shown excellent racecraft, but there’s already a taint to his reputation. That hasn’t stopped him becoming the hottest property in this year’s F1 driver market and why McLaren moved fast to snap up the 21-year-old

Formula 1
Sep 30, 2022
The unintended benefit that F1's new engine rules era will deliver Plus

The unintended benefit that F1's new engine rules era will deliver

Formula 1's incoming engine rules shake-up has multiple targets. But it may also solve what has been a bone of contention since the hybrids arrived in 2014. The new plan will allow the series to pump up the volume

Formula 1
Sep 29, 2022
How de Vries made himself impossible to ignore for a belated F1 chance Plus

How de Vries made himself impossible to ignore for a belated F1 chance

Nyck de Vries appeared to have missed his opportunity to break into Formula 1 as he was passed over for more exciting talents who have now become frontrunners and title fighters. But after catching the eye outside of the F1 sphere, before his stunning impromptu grand prix debut in Italy, will it lead to a delayed full-time race seat?

Formula 1
Sep 29, 2022
Can Hamilton produce another Singapore magic moment? Plus

Can Hamilton produce another Singapore magic moment?

The Singapore Grand Prix has, explains BEN EDWARDS, played an important role in Lewis Hamilton’s Formula 1 career. As the series returns to the Marina Bay Street Circuit for the first time in three years, he faces the latest challenge with an underperforming Mercedes car

Formula 1
Sep 28, 2022
Why Sainz is key to Ferrari achieving its chairman's F1 goals Plus

Why Sainz is key to Ferrari achieving its chairman's F1 goals

Although Ferrari's chances of title glory in 2022 have evaporated, chairman John Elkann expects the team to have chalked up both championships by 2026. Both require drivers to play the team game and, having now become more comfortable with the F1-75, Carlos Sainz may be Ferrari's key to title glory

Formula 1
Sep 27, 2022
How F1 has tried to avoid repeating its 2014 engine rules mistakes Plus

How F1 has tried to avoid repeating its 2014 engine rules mistakes

With Formula 1’s future engine regulations now agreed, MARK GALLAGHER wonders if they will provide a more competitive field than past attempts actually managed

Formula 1
Sep 26, 2022
How its faltering first turbo car advanced a Williams-Honda glory era Plus

How its faltering first turbo car advanced a Williams-Honda glory era

STUART CODLING charts the development of the Williams FW09, the ugly duckling that heralded the start of the title-winning Williams-Honda partnership

Formula 1
Sep 25, 2022