Ferrari considering radical F1 engine concept for 2022

Ferrari is considering a radical new engine concept for its 2022 Formula 1 project that could feature a design never seen in the sport before

Ferrari considering radical F1 engine concept for 2022

As the outfit prepares for the all-new era of F1, there are suggestions from Maranello that part of its plan includes a total overhaul of its engine.

The Italian team was caught on the back foot last year when a series of technical directives from the FIA regarding fuel flow measurements led it to suffer a power drop.

The lack of competitiveness on the horsepower front, allied to an overly draggy car, resulted in Ferrari enduring its worst season in F1 for decades.

Ferrari is working on an upgraded engine for 2021 which it hopes will allow it to cut the deficit to the benchmark Mercedes power unit. However, even more ambitious work is being done for next year.

According to sources, Ferrari is ready to take a risk on an innovative engine that, if it works, could prove to be a game-changer in the sport.

The work is the result of efforts put in by Wolf Zimmermann, who has been entrusted with thinking up the concept for the power unit that will power the new era cars.

One change that looks set to be adopted is for Ferrari to go down the Mercedes route of separating the compressor from the turbo - an layout that Honda also switched to several years ago.

Both elements on the Ferrari are currently on the gearbox side of the engine, but from next year the two elements will be either side of it - connected by a shaft.

But beyond that philosophical change, it is also understood that Ferrari is looking at taking the idea one step further - and bring the compressor actually inside the 6-cylinder intake box with an all-new arrangement for the intercooler.

Such a revolutionary change would not only bring with it performance gains, but would also open up more aerodynamic opportunities having made the overall engine layout more compact.

The trimming back of the engine size would also bring with it a weight benefit which could help with both the centre of gravity and the location of any ballast.

The new design idea will present a huge challenge, both in terms of ensuring that the performance gains work but also in guaranteeing that reliability is not compromised.

While some within Ferrari may have preferred for the team to carry on with a more traditional power unit design and use an evolution of the version that will be used in the SF21, the Italian outfit is determined to make the most of the opportunities afforded by the new 2022 regulations.

shares
comments
When Senna signed a race-by-race deal for $1m per race

Previous article

When Senna signed a race-by-race deal for $1m per race

Next article

Portuguese Grand Prix set for vacant F1 calendar slot on 2 May

Portuguese Grand Prix set for vacant F1 calendar slot on 2 May
Load comments

About this article

Series Formula 1
Teams Ferrari
Author Franco Nugnes
How a harshly ejected Red Bull star has been hooked by racing again Plus

How a harshly ejected Red Bull star has been hooked by racing again

Driver-turned-DJ Jaime Alguersuari lost his love for motorsport when he was booted out of Formula 1 just as he was starting to polish his rough edges. Having drifted from category to category then turned his back on racing altogether in 2015, he’s come full circle and is planning a return in karts for fun

Why Mercedes isn't confident it's really ahead of Red Bull at Imola Plus

Why Mercedes isn't confident it's really ahead of Red Bull at Imola

While Mercedes struck back against Red Bull by topping the times at Imola on Friday ahead of the Emilia Romagna Grand Prix, the overall picture remains incredibly close. Despite having a possible edge this weekend, the reigning Formula 1 world champion squad is not taking anything for granted...

What Mercedes must do to keep its F1 title challenge on track Plus

What Mercedes must do to keep its F1 title challenge on track

Mercedes may find itself leading the drivers' and constructors' standings after Lewis Hamilton's victory in the Bahrain Grand Prix, but it is well-aware that it came against the odds, with Red Bull clearly ahead on pace. Here's what the Brackley team must do to avoid its crown slipping

Formula 1
Apr 16, 2021
Why Tsunoda can become Japan’s greatest F1 talent Plus

Why Tsunoda can become Japan’s greatest F1 talent

While Japan's fever for motor racing is well-documented, the country has yet to produce a Formula 1 superstar – but that could be about to change, says BEN EDWARDS

Formula 1
Apr 15, 2021
Why the demise of F1's hypocritical spending habit is cause for celebration Plus

Why the demise of F1's hypocritical spending habit is cause for celebration

For too long, F1's richest teams have justified being able to spend as much as they want because that's the way they've always conducted their business. STUART CODLING says that's no reason not to kick a bad habit

Formula 1
Apr 14, 2021
The double whammy that is defining Vettel’s F1 fate Plus

The double whammy that is defining Vettel’s F1 fate

It's been a tough start to Sebastian Vettel's Aston Martin F1 career, with a lack of pre-season testing mileage followed by an incident-packed Bahrain GP. But two key underlying factors mean a turnaround is not guaranteed

Formula 1
Apr 14, 2021
The diva that stole a march on F1’s wide-bodied opposition Plus

The diva that stole a march on F1’s wide-bodied opposition

In 2017 new F1 technical regulations were supposed to add drama - and peg Mercedes back. STUART CODLING looks at the car which, while troubled, set the stage for the wide-bodied Formula 1 era

Formula 1
Apr 13, 2021
The themes to watch in F1’s Imola return Plus

The themes to watch in F1’s Imola return

Three weeks is a long time in Formula 1, but in the reshaped start to the 2021 season the teams head to Imola to pick things up after the frenetic Bahrain opener. Here's what to look out for and the developments to follow at the Emilia Romagna Grand Prix

Formula 1
Apr 13, 2021