Stevens proving himself in endurance racing after Le Mans class win

Ex-Formula 1 driver Will Stevens believes he is starting to prove himself as an endurance racing driver following his GTE Am class victory in the Le Mans 24 Hours

Stevens proving himself in endurance racing after Le Mans class win

Stevens, who raced for the now-defunct Marussia F1 squad in 2015 before making the switch to sportscars last year, came away with a dominant win in the GTE Am division at La Sarthe last weekend in the JMW-run #84 Ferrari he shared with Rob Smith and Dries Vanthoor.

Last year, Stevens made his first Le Mans start for the G-Drive LMP2 squad, but he decided to eschew the chance to return to the prototype class in favour of a tilt at GTE-Am honours.

"I'm just really happy that I got this opportunity," Stevens told Autosport.

"The results are really starting to come now.

"I need to prove what I can do coming from Formula 1 and bits and pieces I've done before. I'm starting to do that.

"We expected to be strong. We had a great line-up, a great car in the #84 and the team did an amazing job.

"The pitstops were quick, we didn't make any mistakes on track and that counted for a lot on track.

"The number one rule at Le Mans is make no mistakes.

"During the night we really pushed on a tried to get a bigger gap. The pace was super-strong then."

Stevens' main programme in 2017 is in the Blancpain GT series with Audi, but the 25-year-old suggested his Le Mans class win could open the door to more regular GTE appearances next season.

"In terms of next year, who knows, but these kinds of results carry huge momentum," he said.

"Hopefully I'm proving to people what I can do and what I can bring.

"My main focus for the championship this year is Blancpain, and results there have also been strong, we're in a good position in the points.

"When you can come and do huge one-off races like Le Mans and come away with a win, that's extremely pleasing.

"We've still got a long way left in the year and who knows where we'll be next year."

shares
comments
How Le Mans sums up racing's major problems

Previous article

How Le Mans sums up racing's major problems

Next article

G-Drive's Rusinov responds to 'very harsh' Le Mans crash penalty

G-Drive's Rusinov responds to 'very harsh' Le Mans crash penalty
Load comments
How overlooked Mazda produced one of Le Mans' greatest shocks Plus

How overlooked Mazda produced one of Le Mans' greatest shocks

The screaming rotary-engined Mazda 787 is regarded as one of the most popular Le Mans 24 Hours-winning cars, but until its surprise success on this day 30 years ago it was never regarded as a likely victor. But that reckoned without a new technical partner, some canny political manoeuvring and a rival's bizarre self-inflicted weakness

WEC
Jun 23, 2021
How Alpine's stunted Portimao charge helped Toyota to keep clear Plus

How Alpine's stunted Portimao charge helped Toyota to keep clear

Despite going stride for stride for pace at Portimao, Alpine’s grandfathered LMP1 couldn’t convert pole position into a sustained victory fight against Toyota. And due to rules and car limitations that are set in stone, the French manufacturer will be searching for solutions in its own battle of endurance

WEC
Jun 14, 2021
Toyota hits the ton — charting 100 world championship sportscar starts Plus

Toyota hits the ton — charting 100 world championship sportscar starts

The Japanese manufacturer is celebrating its 100th world championship prototype start in this weekend's Portimao 8 Hours round of the World Endurance Championship. Here are the major milestones on the road to three figures since the earliest low-key days of its entry into the Group C arena nearly 40 years ago

WEC
Jun 12, 2021
The philosophical problems the WEC's new Hypercar class is already facing Plus

The philosophical problems the WEC's new Hypercar class is already facing

OPINION: Most of the column inches after the World Endurance Championship's opener were centred around the relative pace of the Hypercar class and the LMP2s, but there's another question that needs addressing in order for the new division to have a successful future

WEC
May 7, 2021
How stumbling Toyota drew first blood in the WEC's new era Plus

How stumbling Toyota drew first blood in the WEC's new era

Amid concerns that the new Hypercar class would be upstaged on debut by the spec LMP2 machines at Spa, Toyota delivered the pole and victory that the vast majority of observers expected. But neither car had a clean run, which gave the grandfathered Alpine LMP1 an unexpected shot at glory

WEC
May 4, 2021
Seven things to watch in the 2021 World Endurance Championship Plus

Seven things to watch in the 2021 World Endurance Championship

Beyond the slender grid of headline-grabbing hypercars, there are numerous subplots and changes to look out for in the new season of the WEC, which gets underway at Spa this weekend. Here's the seven key things you need to know about

WEC
Apr 30, 2021
What to expect from sportscar racing's bold new Hypercar era Plus

What to expect from sportscar racing's bold new Hypercar era

A slim field of three cars will be entered in the Hypercar class for the first round of the World Endurance Championship's post-LMP1 age. But there are plenty of reasons for optimism with the new wave of manufacturer entries and competing class philosophies just around the corner

WEC
Apr 29, 2021
How Aston Martin Racing scaled new heights in the Prodrive era Plus

How Aston Martin Racing scaled new heights in the Prodrive era

The 2021 World Endurance Championship kicks off at Spa this weekend, but for the first time since its 2012 inception there will be no works Aston Martins in the GTE-Pro class. As its new era in Formula 1 begins, Aston leaves behind a legacy of success courtesy of its Prodrive-run factory programme that was a hit from the word go in 2005

WEC
Apr 27, 2021