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MotoGP set to remain faster than WSBK under 2027 rules – how do they compare now?

FIM president Jorge Viegas insists MotoGP will remain faster than World Superbikes under the former’s rules revolution in 2027 despite the reduction in engine capacity.

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Earlier this month MotoGP announced the framework for its 2027 rules revolution, which is headlined by a switch from 1000cc to 850cc engines and a reduction in aerodynamics.

The aim of MotoGP’s rules reset is to improve the on-track spectacle, while also becoming more road relevant, sustainable and cost-effective.

However, the move to a small engine formula has led to fears that MotoGP bikes could end up slower than the production-based machines used in WSBK.

FIM president Viegas states new rules will be brought in for WSBK in the next few years to ensure that speeds are kept under control and MotoGP remains the fastest two wheel series on the planet.

“Obviously we want to have MotoGP on top and Superbikes… it was meant to be stock bikes with some changes,” he said at the French GP.

“We have also started working two years ago in changing the regulations in Superbikes.

“Some things will happen very, very soon, but in a way that we keep a distance between MotoGP and Superbikes.

“We are talking with all the manufacturers. We still have more manufacturers in Superbikes than we do in MotoGP.

“There’s also great work being done and a coessential solution [is coming].”

Photo by: Gold and Goose / Motorsport Images

How do MotoGP and WSBK speeds compare?

On the current WSBK calendar, there are currently seven tracks that also host MotoGP rounds.

Below is a comparison between pole laps for each series at these seven venues and the fastest race lap for each.

There are some caveats to consider, chiefly the difference in tyres. While Michelin’s range of rubber for a MotoGP weekend is standard for every session, WSBK uses qualifying tyres and has available a softer compound for the sprint race.

Track comparison:

Phillip Island
MotoGP: Qualifying lap record – 1m27.246s; Race lap record – 1m28.108s
WSBK: Qualifying lap record – 1m27.916s; Race lap records – 1m28.564s

Barcelona
MotoGP: Qualifying lap record – 1m38.639s; Race lap record – 1m39.939s
WSBK: Qualifying lap record – 1m39.489s; Race lap record – 1m40.955s

Assen
MotoGP: Qualifying lap record – 1m31.472s; Race lap record – 1m32.500s
WSBK: Qualifying lap record – 1m32.934s; Race lap record – 1m33.620s

Aragon
MotoGP: Qualifying lap record – 1m46.069s; Race lap record – 1m48.089s
WSBK: Qualifying lap record – 1m47.973s; Race lap record – 1m49.028s

Algarve
MotoGP: Qualifying lap record – 1m37.226s; Race lap record – 1m38.872s
WSBK: Qualifying lap record – 1m39.610s; Race lap record – 1m38.826s

Jerez
MotoGP: Qualifying lap record – 1m36.170s; Race lap record – 1m37.449s
WSBK: Qualifying lap record – 1m38.247s; Race lap record – 1m39.004s

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