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2027 MotoGP rules "will make riders' lives more difficult"

MotoGP's 2027 regulations have been met with generally positive thoughts from the paddock, with Joan Mir admitting the new bikes "will make riders' lives more difficult".

Joan Mir, Repsol Honda Team

Photo by: Gold and Goose / Motorsport Images

Earlier this week, MotoGP announced the technical regulation framework it will introduce in 2027, headlined by a switch to 850cc engines.

The aim of the new rules is to improve safety and the on-track spectacle through the removal of ride-height devices and reduction in aerodynamic development.

Honda's Mir believes bikes in 2027 will become harder to ride but this is "very positive" for the series.

"It will probably make the riders' lives more difficult," he said on Thursday at the French Grand Prix. "Probably the rider will make more of the difference.

"This, I think, is something very positive for the championship, for the heroes, for everything.

"Also, all the details like the starts where you can make a huge difference if you make a good one, but the opposite also. These are things we don't see now."

Aprilia's Maverick Vinales echoed these comments, noting that the removal of ride-height devices will benefit riders "who have more technique".

"For sure, the rear ride-height device [being removed] will help the riders who have more technique," he said.

"Because it's not the same. Right now, you just open full throttle and see the bike push and whatever. But without that, when you have a lot of wheely, the riding style will change a lot.

Maverick Vinales, Aprilia Racing

Maverick Vinales, Aprilia Racing

Photo by: MotoGP

"So, you cannot open full gas. So, it will change. For me, the level of the rider will mean more in terms of lap time."

Eight-time world champion Marc Marquez added: "I think this is good for the riders, because in the end if you have less technical things on the bike, the rider can make more of a difference.

"And the value of the rider will be better, because you will look for the rider. So, this is something that I like. They follow a bit in Formula 1 like this last year, so let's see."

While Jack Miller thinks the regulations were a good move for MotoGP, he feels the aerodynamic changes should have gone further.

"They make the bikes ugly," the KTM rider noted. "Motorcycle racing is supposed to be beautiful.

"So, that will change and I don't think it's putting anyone at a clear disadvantage nowadays because everybody's aero is pretty bloody good.

"They're all spending millions of dollars to develop their fairings.

"So, we're kind of at a platform where we're like, 'alright, time to pack up'. Everyone's got nukes, we might not use them anymore so time to get rid of them."

Reigning double world champion Francesco Bagnaia also feels removing all aerodynamic fairings from the rules would lead to better racing than reducing engine power, which he called "strange" as he feels MotoGP bikes "should be the strongest ever".

Francesco Bagnaia, Ducati Team

Francesco Bagnaia, Ducati Team

Photo by: Ducati Corse

"I'm very curious to try the engine, the 850, it will be nice this kind of change," Ducati's Bagnaia noted.

"But the thing that is a bit strange to me is that we are in the top of motorsport advancement, developing our prototypes.

"So, they have to be the strongest ever and we will go to reduce the speed. So, it's something a bit strange. But we will get used to it.

"The thing is, if we want more battle the only thing to remove is the aerodynamics, because apart from that the rest is not for the battle, it's just for safety."

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