Carburetion Day: Sharp still the man to beat

Scott Sharp proved two weeks ago that he had the fastest qualifying set-up on Pole Day for the Indianapolis 500. And during Thursday's final practice session for Sunday's 85th Indy 500, Sharp showed that he may have the fastest set-up for race day, too.

Carburetion Day: Sharp still the man to beat

Sharp, who will start on the pole when he leads the field of 33 to the green flag at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway, ran a lap at 223.678 miles per hour in his Dallara-Oldsmobile Aurora - the fastest lap in Thursday's Carburetion Day. The two-hour practice session was the final on-track activity before the race.

Gil de Ferran of Team Penske was second at 222.757 mph, followed by 1996 Indy 500 winner Buddy Lazier's 222.392 mph, Greg Ray's 222.372 and Jeff Ward's 222.039 mph lap.

"Obviously, it's the last chance to run hard," Sharp said. "We wanted to confirm the race-starting set-up was strong out of the box. The car was real strong and we just didn't need to stay out and run any longer. That was probably the real advantage of running today. No one has had an opportunity to run in cool conditions. It gives you some data to be able to guess off for Sunday."

De Ferran's car no longer carries the Marlboro decals after the tobacco company yielded to Attorney Generals from various states, who strictly enforced a tobacco agreement that limits cigarette sponsorships to one auto racing series of choice. De Ferran is attempting to give team owner Roger Penske his 11th Indy 500 victory.

"Overall, I'm very happy with the car," de Ferran said. "It's handling very well. I'm very comfortable with where we are at. Now we just have to wait three days until the race. We know what we have, and we know what we have to do."

Lazier is the defending Indy Racing League champion and won this race in 1996, the first year it was part of the IRL. He has been rather quiet for most of the month, but has an outstanding record in this event since his victory five years ago.

"I felt the practice went quite well," Lazier said. "We ran a speed that we were able to get a good feel for, gear wise. It's a pretty fast day out there, faster than I thought it would be. We have a pretty good idea. At this stage we're not going to make too many changes. This is our race engine. We did a leak test to make sure there were no leaks and set-up verification."

Greg Ray will start in the middle of the front row. Only the pole winner has a faster ride than Ray's Dallara-Aurora.

"I think we're OK," Ray said. "We ran on full tanks and worn tyres. We were just trying to confirm the gear ratios. If it's like this on race day, I think we're OK. If it's a little cooler than this, we'll have to come back and make some adjustments."

Jeff Ward rounded out the top five after announcing that Aerosmith would be the primary sponsor of his G Force/Aurora.

"I'm really excited about this car," Ward said of the new pink and silver livery. "It looks good and it runs even better. We didn't get into any traffic today, but the car was really balanced, so traffic won't affect our performance. Today was a great practice. Our speed was good and consistent, which will be most important on race day."

The start of practice was delayed 15 minutes because of wet spots on the 2.5-mile race track because of early morning showers in the Indianapolis area. Sunny and cool conditions were present on Thursday. Thirty-five cars were eligible to participate in practice, although only 33 will start the race on Sunday. The other two - Shigeaki Hattori and Memo Gidley - are alternates, which means they will start the race if one of the other 33 is unable to start for whatever reason.

Cory Witherill had a loose oil fitting which caused his engine to smoke, but that problem was repaired. Jeret Schroeder had a problem with his gearbox when his car was stuck in sixth gear. Those were the only problems encountered in the practice session.

shares
comments
Bump Day notebook: Foyt's drivers on form

Previous article

Bump Day notebook: Foyt's drivers on form

Next article

Penske must drop Marlboro logos for Indy 500

Penske must drop Marlboro logos for Indy 500
Load comments
Why IndyCar title glory is just the start for Ganassi's new star Plus

Why IndyCar title glory is just the start for Ganassi's new star

Newly-crowned IndyCar champion Alex Palou has been lauded as a complete driver and veteran-like in only his second season. The 24-year-old is still in the early days of his career, but the parallels are there for all to see with his six-time champion Chip Ganassi Racing team-mate who has been CGR's team leader since 2014

Why Grosjean's oval commitment shows he's serious about IndyCar Plus

Why Grosjean's oval commitment shows he's serious about IndyCar

One of motorsport’s worst-kept secrets is now out in the open, and Romain Grosjean has been confirmed as an Andretti Autosport IndyCar driver in 2022. It marks a remarkable turnaround after the abrupt end to his Formula 1 career, and is a firm indication of his commitment to challenge for the IndyCar Series title  

IndyCar
Sep 24, 2021
Why IndyCar’s longest silly-season is still far from over Plus

Why IndyCar’s longest silly-season is still far from over

OPINION: The 2021 IndyCar silly season has been one of the silliest for many years, as many talented drivers remain in play – with new pieces to the puzzle being added all the time. Here's what we know so far about who will end up where in 2022

IndyCar
Sep 15, 2021
Why IndyCar's generational shift isn't as stark as it appears Plus

Why IndyCar's generational shift isn't as stark as it appears

OPINION: The rise of two drivers racing only their second full-season IndyCar campaigns to head the points with four races to go has led to some observers doubting the credentials of the old guard. But they haven't faded away, there's merely a deeper talent pool that is helping to make this season one of the best in recent years

IndyCar
Aug 20, 2021
The F1 champion who became an Indy king in his second career Plus

The F1 champion who became an Indy king in his second career

Emerson Fittipaldi’s decision to go racing with his brother led to him falling out of F1, but he bloomed again on the IndyCar scene. NIGEL ROEBUCK considers a career of two halves

Formula 1
Jul 31, 2021
The lasting legacy of a fallen Indycar rookie Plus

The lasting legacy of a fallen Indycar rookie

Jeff Krosnoff was plucked out of obscurity to become a respected and highly popular professional in Japan, and then got his big break in Indycar for 1996. But a tragic accident at Toronto 25 years ago cut short a promising career and curtailed his regular team-mate Mauro Martini's passion for racing

IndyCar
Jul 14, 2021
The two key areas where Dixon needs to re-assert his authority Plus

The two key areas where Dixon needs to re-assert his authority

OPINION: Having been Chip Ganassi Racing's IndyCar focal point for the best part of a decade, Scott Dixon has been so far outgunned by new team-mate Alex Palou in 2021. After finishing behind the Spaniard at his traditional happy hunting ground at Mid-Ohio, Dixon has work to do to assume his traditional position in the team and the standings

IndyCar
Jul 6, 2021
The winners and losers of IndyCar 2021 so far Plus

The winners and losers of IndyCar 2021 so far

At the halfway point in the 2021 IndyCar Series season, we've had seven winners in eight races, spread between five teams – none of them Team Penske. In this unusual season, even by IndyCar standards, who’s excelling and who’s dragging their heels?

IndyCar
Jun 18, 2021