Reviews
Topic

Reviews

Gran Turismo Sport review: How latest instalment breaks with tradition

Before getting into this review, it's worth pointing out something that might seem obvious: GT Sport is not Gran Turismo 7, and shouldn't be treated as such

Gran Turismo Sport review: How latest instalment breaks with tradition

It marks something of a departure from PS3-era GT games - which, as it turns out, is no bad thing.

It was clear at the game's launch last year that its main focus would be its online mode, with a pair of FIA-certified online tournaments as the centrepiece.

Much ink has been spilt over the lack of a lengthy single-player campaign mode for players to sink their teeth into, and anyone expecting a full-fat Gran Turismo title akin to 2013's GT6 - complete with the Goodwood Hill and Lunar Rover missions - is likely to be disappointed.

But for everybody else, GT Sport offers something which is altogether leaner, more compact and more focused - and critically, more enjoyable than its immediate predecessors.

The ultimate goal of GT Sport, as series developer Kazunori Yamauchi alluded to last year, is to make as many gamers into real-life race drivers as possible, via the FIA Gran Turismo digital licence.

As of last year, 22 ASNs (including those of the UK, India, Australia and New Zealand) had signed up to the scheme, although there has been little word since on exactly how the licence will be made attainable.

In certain respects, GT Sport is a throwback to an earlier time in Gran Turismo history, before the franchise arguably became too bloated for its own good with the addition of countless features that added little real value in GT5. GT6, while much more refined, largely continued this trend.

By contrast, GT Sport does away with all the pointless peripheral clutter and perfectly captures the essence of what made the franchise so great back in its early-2000s heyday.

In an offline race, players are greeted by the beautiful graphics they've come to take for granted over 20 years and four console generations of GT games. But in the gameplay department, there has been a small but fundamental improvement.

GT6 had many races where an experienced player, expected to lap multiple seconds faster than the opposition, was simply tasked with closing down a large deficit to the leader in a fixed time period. Actual wheel-to-wheel racing with the AI was relatively rare.

Not so in GT Sport. Setting the difficulty to 'professional' will provide a challenge even for the hardiest GT fans, while the AI is much more aggressive and assertive.

An improved HUD also allows you to adjust things like brake balance and traction control on the fly, while also following in F1 2017's footsteps by providing live deltas to your opponents.

Boasting only 162 cars at launch, GT Sport marks a major reduction compared to the 1,000+ machines available in GT6. But gone are the hundreds of 'standard' cars, which were little more than updated PS2 models and often looked so out of place next to their 'premium' cousins.

When it comes to the cars themselves, the focus is firmly on newer models, with old favourites like the original NSX, Supra, R34 Skyline and RX-7 notably absent (at least for now), and racing machinery.

Road models ranging from the humble Peugeot RCZ to the mighty Bugatti Veyron have been given fantasy 'Group 3' and 'Group 4' variants to ensure players have plenty of cars to choose from when they head online, while the new Livery Editor (replete with Autosport decal) allows you a degree of customisation that was lacking in previous GT games.

As for the track list, at launch there are 40 layouts across 17 locations available, with the focus largely on a roster of new fictional venues at the expense of real-life tracks like Le Mans, Silverstone, Monza, Spa and Fuji that had become staples of the series.

Brands Hatch, Suzuka, Willow Springs, the Nurburgring and Bathurst have all survived, however, and are joined by Interlagos, which makes a welcome GT debut along with new fantasy layouts like 'Autodromo Lago Maggiore' and 'Dragon Trail', which are just as challenging as some of their real-life counterparts.

Admittedly, the offline single-player offering is relatively modest, with the Arcade mode complemented by a three-pronged Campaign mode comprising the 'Driving School' (similar to the old licence tests of yore), 'Mission Challenge' and 'Circuit Experience' modes.

But to think of Campaign mode as the heart of the game is the wrong approach, as it's really little more than an in-depth tutorial to prepare you for the rigours of online gameplay.

With the FIA-sanctioned Nations Cup and Manufacturer Fan Cup tournaments set to launch early next month, players are left for the time being with a choice of three 'Daily Races', which take place at 20-minute intervals on a rotation of three different tracks.

As well as out-and-out speed, GT Sport also places heavy emphasis on clean driving (even forcing you to watch a pair of 'Racing Etiquette' videos before diving into the online action), awarding players a 'sportsmanship rating' that gets a knock whenever they are involved in an on-track clash.

Such an online-focused product may not be to everybody's taste, but Gran Turismo deserves credit for taking a step back and deciding exactly what it wishes to accomplish.

shares
comments
Actor Michael Fassbender wants second season in Ferrari Challenge

Previous article

Actor Michael Fassbender wants second season in Ferrari Challenge

Next article

Giorgio Piola launches Formula 1-inspired watch collection

Giorgio Piola launches Formula 1-inspired watch collection
Load comments
The one-time Schumacher rival rebooting his career Down Under Plus

The one-time Schumacher rival rebooting his career Down Under

Joey Mawson made waves in the middle of the last decade, beating future Haas Formula 1 driver Mick Schumacher - among other highly-rated talents - to the 2016 German F4 title. A run in F1's feeder GP3 category only caused his career to stall, but now back in Australia Mawson's S5000 title success has set that to rights

General
May 8, 2021
The lesson football’s would-be wreckers could learn from racing Plus

The lesson football’s would-be wreckers could learn from racing

OPINION: The greed-driven push for a European Super League that threatened to tear football apart is collapsing at the seams. Motor racing's equivalent, the football-themed Superleague Formula series of 2008-11, was everything that the proposed ESL never could be

General
Apr 21, 2021
The F1 and Indy 'nearly man' that found contentment in Japan Plus

The F1 and Indy 'nearly man' that found contentment in Japan

Having had the door to F1 slammed in his face and come within three laps of winning the Indianapolis 500, the collapse of a Peugeot LMP1 shot meant Japan was Bertrand Baguette's last chance of a career. But it's one which he has grasped with both hands

General
Feb 27, 2021
The female all-rounder who arrived "too early" Plus

The female all-rounder who arrived "too early"

From Formula 3 to truck racing, Dakar and EuroNASCAR via a winning stint in the DTM, there's not much Ellen Lohr hasn't seen in a stellar racing career that highlights the merit in being a generalist. But she believes her career came too early...

General
Feb 17, 2021
How Radical's latest machines fare on track Plus

How Radical's latest machines fare on track

The lightweight sportscar manufacturer has not rewritten the rulebook with its latest machines, but the new SR3 XX and SR10 still provide a step forward on its previous successful models

General
Feb 8, 2021
The real-life racing rogues stranger than fiction Plus

The real-life racing rogues stranger than fiction

The forthcoming Netflix film linking the world of underworld crime and motorsport plays on a theme that isn't exactly new. Over the years, several shady figures have attempted to make it in racing before their dubious dealings caught up with them

General
Jan 31, 2021
How a GP is thriving in a COVID-free territory Plus

How a GP is thriving in a COVID-free territory

The New Zealand Grand Prix's mix of rising talent and big-name stars thrilled the crowds (yes, remember crowds?) assembled for the Toyota Racing Series meeting at Hampton Downs last weekend and left distant observers craving a repeat

General
Jan 26, 2021
How a much-changed Macau GP kept the party going Plus

How a much-changed Macau GP kept the party going

OPINION: The 67th edition of the Macau Grand Prix might have been a largely muted affair to the outside world without its international influx and star line-ups, another victim to the COVID-19 pandemic, but organisers deserve huge credit for keeping the party going

General
Nov 24, 2020