Subscribe

Sign up for free

  • Get quick access to your favorite articles

  • Manage alerts on breaking news and favorite drivers

  • Make your voice heard with article commenting.

Autosport Plus

Discover premium content
Subscribe
Max Verstappen, Red Bull Racing RB20
Autosport Plus
Special feature

Why successfully emulating Red Bull’s dominant F1 concept isn’t straightforward

“Convergence” – a bland euphemism for the rest of the grid essentially copying the features of the fastest car. We’ve already seen the signs as Formula 1’s ground-effect ruleset matures. But, as STUART CODLING explains, several competitors have already discovered that copying Red Bull doesn’t guarantee success…

One of the key words bandied around at the dawn of Formula 1’s second ground-effect era was “revolution”. Appropriate enough at the time as the stakeholders chased a dream of an action-packed future in which a new emphasis on underbody aerodynamics would banish processional racing. Less so now as design orthodoxy naturally coalesces around the most successful solution: Red Bull’s record-breaking RB19.

It’s understandable given the major inputs into such decisions: the sheer margin of Red Bull’s dominance in 2023; the existence of a cost cap which naturally restricts experimentation; and the fact that the next rules reset is two seasons away.

Previous article F1 world champions to have never driven for Ferrari
Next article Russell says he can now attack corners with new Mercedes F1 car

Sign up for free

  • Get quick access to your favorite articles

  • Manage alerts on breaking news and favorite drivers

  • Make your voice heard with article commenting.

Autosport Plus

Discover premium content
Subscribe