Mosley explains rules position

With the September 6 deadline for the Technical Working Group (TWG) to produce proposals to slow Grand Prix cars ahead of the 2005 season having passed, FIA president Max Mosley explained at Monza what happens next

Mosley explains rules position

"At the beginning of July, we gave the TWG notice to produce proposals to slow the cars," Mosley said. "Two months went by and there were no proposals so, in accordance with the Concorde Agreement, we have put forward three packages of proposals to slow the cars and have invited the TWG to choose one of them.

"All three packages have three elements - tyres, aerodynamics and engines. The aerodynamics package is mostly liberal in package 1, slightly less liberal in package 2 and still less open in package 3.

"The tyres are the same everywhere, the two sets per weekend that I think everyone knows about.

"As for the engines, package 1 is a very restrictive engine, package 2 is slightly less restrictive one and package 3 is a fairly free engine, with a requirement that the major manufacturers, in consideration of being allowed to spend huge sums of money on getting more horsepower, supply the small teams with engines."

Mosley emphasised, however, that in all three of the engine packages, he was talking about 2.4-litre V8s for 2006.

Mosley also outlined the position of the teams, as he understood it. "As far as the aerodynamics are concerned, they are all happy with package 2, as far as the tyres are concerned they are all happy, and on the engines, six or seven are happy with package 2, and three are not happy. The three that are not happy have said that they would prefer to stay with a 3.0-litre V10 in 2005/6, also a single race engine, and they would then consider going to a 2.7-litre V10 in 2007."

From September 7, there are 45 days during which the TWG has the possibility of choosing one of these three packages and, Mosley added, it may be that eight of them will agree finally on probably package 2 (the necessary 80% quorum) which is the one that the seven teams would appear to support. If that happens the matter will go immediately to the World Council for a decision. If it doesn't happen, at the end of the 45 days, the FIA is then free to impose one of the packages itself.

In a press briefing at Monza, Mosley also made it abundantly clear that he would not be influenced by the threat of manufacturers leaving the sport if they do not like the engine regulations (Click HERE for the full story).

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Mosley gets tough on engines

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