FIA assures Formula 1 teams new oil burn rules 'will do the job'

The FIA has played down fears that Formula 1 teams could still get around new oil burn limits in qualifying

FIA assures Formula 1 teams new oil burn rules 'will do the job'

A host of new rules have been introduced this year in a bid to prevent teams from burning oil, or using additives in their lubricants, to get a power boost.

Despite the changes, Red Bull boss Christian Horner remains concerned that the new restrictions - especially a limit of 0.6-litres of oil use per 100 kilometres - still leaves the door open for teams to get around the rules in qualifying.

F1 race director Charlie Whiting understands Horner's concerns, but believes that what the FIA has put in place will be enough.

"We've closed down all the things that they were able to do last year, mainly via oil spec," explained Whiting.

"Not only was oil being burned a little, but they were putting things in the oil to aid combustion, because there was no real oil spec last year. Now there is.

"Now they can only use approved oils, so they give us a sample just like they do with fuel, and that has to be approved and that is the only oil that they can use.

"We've tightened up the engine rules in Article 5 of the Technical Regulations, and we've also routed the breather that can no longer go back into the air intake which was the biggest issue.

"That has to go out the back like virtually every other racing car in the world.

"And we've told them they can't use more than 0.6 litres per 100 km.

"All those things combined I think will do the job."

Although measuring oil use over a single qualifying lap to calculate the 0.6l/100km limit is tougher than over a full race, Whiting has faith that the FIA measuring system is good enough to do that.

"The loophole being talked about is the difficulty of checking how much oil has actually been used during qualifying," he explained.

"You've got a small amount of laps, so if you're looking at a percentage you've got to try and detect smaller quantities that have been used. That's a challenge.

"So we've made them all fit homologated oil sensors in their main oil tanks, but they've got auxiliary oil tanks as well, so we've got to be able to check those too.

"It's just a matter of detailed checking just to make sure that they are respecting the 0.6 even over short distances."

Mercedes has insisted that the oil burn changes will not affect its performance, with team boss Toto Wolff adamant that the final spec of engine it used in 2017 was well within the 0.6l limit.

"The targets that have been set last season of the 0.6 level, we have met immediately - we have that in the autumn," he said during an event with fuel partner Petronas this week.

"We brought the engine early [to Spa] but we met the limits of 0.6."

shares
comments
Why Mercedes avoided 'survival'-only hypersoft in Formula 1 testing

Previous article

Why Mercedes avoided 'survival'-only hypersoft in Formula 1 testing

Next article

How Bottas can beat Hamilton – by the man who did it

How Bottas can beat Hamilton – by the man who did it
Load comments

About this article

Series Formula 1
Author Jonathan Noble
The diva that stole a march on F1’s wide-bodied opposition Plus

The diva that stole a march on F1’s wide-bodied opposition

In 2017 new F1 technical regulations were supposed to add drama - and peg Mercedes back. STUART CODLING looks at the car which, while troubled, set the stage for the wide-bodied Formula 1 era

The themes to watch in F1’s Imola return Plus

The themes to watch in F1’s Imola return

Three weeks is a long time in Formula 1, but in the reshaped start to the 2021 season the teams head to Imola to pick things up after the frenetic Bahrain opener. Here's what to look out for and the developments to follow at the Emilia Romagna Grand Prix

The 'new' F1 drivers who need to improve at Imola Plus

The 'new' F1 drivers who need to improve at Imola

After a pandemic-hit winter of seat-swapping, F1 kicked off its season with several new faces in town, other drivers adapting to new environments, and one making a much-anticipated comeback. BEN ANDERSON looks at who made the most of their opportunity and who needs to try harder…

Formula 1
Apr 12, 2021
The delay that quashed Aston Martin’s last F1 venture Plus

The delay that quashed Aston Martin’s last F1 venture

Aston Martin’s only previous foray into Formula 1 in the late 1950s was a short-lived and unsuccessful affair. But it could have been so different, says NIGEL ROEBUCK

Formula 1
Apr 10, 2021
Verstappen exclusive: Why lack of car-racing titles won't hurt Red Bull's ace Plus

Verstappen exclusive: Why lack of car-racing titles won't hurt Red Bull's ace

Max Verstappen’s star quality in Formula 1 is clear. Now equipped with a Red Bull car that is, right now, the world title favourite and the experience to support his talent, could 2021 be the Dutchman’s year to topple the dominant force of Lewis Hamilton and Mercedes?

Formula 1
Apr 9, 2021
Are we at peak F1 right now? Plus

Are we at peak F1 right now?

For many, many years Formula 1 has strived to do and to be better on all fronts. With close competition, a growing fanbase, a stable political landscape and rules in place to encourage sustainability, 2021 is on course to provide an unexpected peak

Formula 1
Apr 8, 2021
How crucial marginal calls will decide the Red Bull vs Mercedes battle in F1 2021 Plus

How crucial marginal calls will decide the Red Bull vs Mercedes battle in F1 2021

The longer Red Bull can maintain a performance edge over Mercedes, the better the odds will be in the team’s favour against the defending world champions. But as the Bahrain Grand Prix showed, many more factors will be critical in the outcome of the 2021 Formula 1 World Championship

Formula 1
Apr 7, 2021
How Williams’ new structure adheres to a growing F1 trend Plus

How Williams’ new structure adheres to a growing F1 trend

Williams held out against the tide for many years but, as MARK GALLAGHER explains, the age of the owner-manager is long gone

Formula 1
Apr 6, 2021