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FIA abandons plans to further restrict Formula 1 radio information

The FIA will not introduce more extreme limitations on pits-to-car radio communication during Formula 1 races, contrary to plans announced last year

Last September, a ban on radio communication was announced, which was later reduced so that it applied only to driver coaching.

But while there were plans to phase in the full ban from the start of this season, FIA F1 race director Charlie Whiting has confirmed that this plan has been abandoned.

"We are going to treat it [the radio communications rules] exactly as we did at the end of last year," said Whiting.

"Anything that could be considered driver coaching will not be allowed.

"But what we said we would do is to do it [introduce the ban] in two stages, we would not allow driver coaching for the remainder of 2014 and then we would clamp down a lot in 2015, but we decided against that."

Plans to introduce such draconian rules on radio communication met resistance from teams, particularly when it comes to the operation of the complex hybrid power units.

As a result, it was decided that the interpretation of the rules used late last season was sufficient.

"The reason we didn't decide to go forward with that plan was the Formula 1 Commission felt there was not really any need to do that," said Whiting.

"It was a fairly severe interpretation of the rules, so I think it was perfectly reasonable to limit it to driver coaching.

"I can't see any reason to change that view during the course of the year."

Although no drivers received penalties in the final seven races of the year after the limitations on radio communications relating to driver coaching were introduced, Whiting said that any such infringements could incur a punishment.

"It's in article 20.1 of the sporting regulations that if a driver is not driving the car alone and unaided, then there is the potential for a penalty," he said.

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