Engine reg details

Motor racing's governing body has confirmed that Formula 1 will make the controversial switch to 2.4 litre V8 engines in 2006, prompting speculation that it will be taken to arbitration by three of the sport's leading manufacturers. Here is the full specification of the 2006 engine regulations

Engine reg details



Changes to current (2004) regulations shown underlined.




Only 4-stroke engines with reciprocating pistons are permitted.
engine capacity must not exceed 3000cc 2400 cc.
Supercharging is forbidden.
All engines must have 10 cylinders configuration and the normal section of each cylinder must be circular.
Engines may must have no more than 5 valves per cylinder



the use of any device, other than the 3.0 litre , four stroke engine described in 5.1 above, to power the car, is not permitted.
The total amount of recoverable energy stored on the car must not exceed 300kJ, any which may be recovered at a rate greater than 2kW must not exceed 20kJ.

Cylinder bore diameter may not exceed 98mm.
Cylinder spacing must be fixed at 106.5mm (+/- 0.2mm).
The crankshaft centreline must not be less than 58mm above the reference plane.

The overall weight of the engine must be a minimum of 95kg.
The centre of gravity of the engine may not lie less than 165mm above the reference plane.
The longitudinal and lateral position of the centre of gravity of the engine must fall within a region that is the geometric centre of the engine, +/- 50mm.
When establishing conformity with Article 5.5, the engine will include the intake system up to and including the air filter, fuel rail and injectors, ignition coils, engine mounted sensors and wiring, alternator, coolant pumps and oil pumps.
When establishing conformity with Article 5.5, the engine will not include liquids, exhaust manifolds, heat shields, oil tanks, water system accumulators, heat exchangers, hydraulic system (e.g. pumps, accumulators, manifolds, servo-valves, solenoids, actuators) except servo-valve and actuator for engine throttle control, fuel pumps nor any component not mounted on the engine when fitted to the car.

Variable geometric length exhaust systems are forbidden.

Variable geometry inlet systems are not permitted.
Variable geometry exhaust systems are not permitted.
Variable valve timing and variable valve lift systems are not permitted.

The pressure of the fuel supplied to the injectors may not exceed 100 bar. Sensors must be fitted which directly measure the pressure of the fuel supplied to the injectors, these signals must be supplied via direct hardwired connections to the FIA data logger.
Only one fuel injector per cylinder is permitted which must inject directly into the side or the top of the inlet port.

Ignition is only permitted by means of a single ignition coil and single spark plug per cylinder. The use of plasma, laser or other high frequency ignition technigues is forbidden.
Only conventional spark plugs that function by high tension electrical discharge across an exposed gap are permitted.
Spark plugs are not subject to the materials restrictions described in Articles 5.13 and 5.14.
The primary regulated voltage on the car must not exceed 17.0V DC. This voltage is defined as the stabilised output from the on-car charging system.

With the following exceptions hydraulic, pneumatic or electronic actuation is forbidden:
a) Electronic solenoids uniquely for the control of engine fluids ;
b) Components providing controlled pressure air for a pneumatic valve system ;
c) A single actuator to operate the throttle system of the engine.

With the exception of electrical fuel pumps engine auxiliaries must be mechanically driven directly from the engine with a fixed speed ratio to the crankshaft.

Other than injection of fuel for the normal purpose of combustion in the engine, any device, system, procedure, construction or design the purpose or effect of which is any decrease in the temperature of the engine intake air is forbidden.
Other than engine sump breather gases and fuel for the normal purpose of combustion in the engine, the spraying of any substance into the engine intake air is forbidden.
Engine materials:
The basic structure of the crankshaft and camshafts must be made from steel or cast iron.
Pistons, cylinder heads and cylinder blocks may not be composite structures which uso carbon or aramid fibre reinforcing materials.



A supplementary device temporarily connected to the car may be used to start the engine both on the grid and in the pits.

If a car is equipped with a stall prevention system, and in order to avoid the possibility of a car involved in an accident being left with the engine running, all such systems must be configured to stop the engine no more than ten seconds after activation.

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