Alonso Becomes Youngest Winner Ever in Hungary

Renault driver Fernando Alonso led from start to finish in the Hungarian Grand Prix on Sunday to become the youngest ever winner of a Formula One race.

Alonso Becomes Youngest Winner Ever in Hungary

Renault driver Fernando Alonso led from start to finish in the Hungarian Grand Prix on Sunday to become the youngest ever winner of a Formula One race.

Spaniard Alonso made the perfect start from pole position and was never troubled as he produced a measured drive to score his first victory and enter the record books as a winner at the age of just 22 years and 26 days.

Alonso's win was also Renault's first victory in Formula One since re-entering the sport last year, with the Spaniard becoming the eighth different race winner this season.

McLaren driver Kimi Raikkonen boosted his title hopes with a solid second place, with Juan Pablo Montoya claiming the final place on the podium - his seventh successive race in the top-three - for Williams-BMW.

With Michael Schumacher only able to finish eighth in a disappointing race for Ferrari, he is now just one point ahead of Montoya in the Championship standings with Raikkonen third a further point behind.

Ralf Schumacher came home fourth behind teammate Montoya despite an early spin which put him at the back of the field, with McLaren's David Coulthard fifth, Mark Webber sixth for Jaguar and Jarno Trulli seventh in his Renault.

The result also helped Williams-BMW overtake Ferrari in the constructors' championship by eight points as they look to end the Italian team's recent domination.

The drivers on the clean side of the track got away well and pole-sitter Alonso raced into the lead from Mark Webber, Rubens Barrichello and Kimi Raikkonen. Toyota's Cristiano Da Matta had been left stuck on the grid.

Montoya, who started fourth, dropped to eighth a place behind Michael Schumacher, but Ralf Schumacher - another to lose ground at the start - spun at turn three and dropped down to 19th.

Alonso opened up a gap at the front as Webber ran second, but Barrichello dropped to fifth. The Ferrari driver passed Webber but went straight on at the chicane, and Raikkonen and Trulli forced their way past as he allowed Webber to take second.

Ralf made inroads into the field and got up to 11th before the first of the pit-stops started with Justin Wilson coming in on lap 12. Alonso and Webber then both stopped the following lap to leave Raikkonen in the lead.

Ralf recovered from his early race spin and ran behind his brother and Montoya, while Jacques Villeneuve was forced into another retirement when hydraulic problems halted him in the pit-lane.

Raikkonen pitted to hand the lead back to Alonso, and Montoya, Schumacher and Ralf all made their first stops soon after. Montoya was the man to gain as he jumped the pair to take fourth place.

Barrichello was then lucky to escape injury when he was sent flying into the tyre barriers at turn one after suffering left-rear suspension failure and losing a wheel at the end of the pit-straight.

Giancarlo Fisichella retired when his Jordan suffered engine failure on lap 30, and Ralf then overtook Michael for sixth with a surprise passing move into turn one.

Jordan's Zsolt Baumgartner, making his debut in place of the injured Ralph Firman, also suffered an engine failure, before Alonso pitted for a second time as did Raikkonen, who ended behind Williams pair Montoya and Ralf.

Both Williams drivers stopped along with Schumacher with Coulthard up to third place after switching to a two-stop strategy. The Scot made his second stop on lap 44 and came out in front of Michael Schumacher, whose engine stopped during his pit-stop.

Alonso continued to destroy the field and led Kimi Raikkonen by 25 seconds, but Jaguar's Justin Wilson was out of luck as engine failure halted his progress. Heinz-Harald Frentzen also parked his Sauber at the side of the track.

All drivers made their final pit-stops with Alonso leading Raikkonen and Montoya, Ralf and Coulthard completing the top-five. Michael Schumacher was left in eighth battling with Jarno Trulli. Montoya was lucky to escape when he spun and he held onto third place ahead of teammate Ralf but he held on to close the gap on Schumacher in the title race.

PROVISIONAL RACE RESULTS The Hungarian Grand Prix Hungaroring, Budapest; 70 laps; 306.873km; Weather: Hot and dry. Classified: Pos Driver Team-Engine Tyres Time 1. Alonso Renault (M) 1h39:01.460 2. Raikkonen McLaren Mercedes (M) + 16.768 3. Montoya Williams BMW (M) + 34.537 4. R.Schumacher Williams BMW (M) + 35.620 5. Coulthard McLaren Mercedes (M) + 56.535 6. Webber Jaguar Cosworth (M) + 1:12.643 7. Trulli Renault (M) + 1 lap 8. M.Schumacher Ferrari (B) + 1 lap 9. Heidfeld Sauber Petronas (B) + 1 lap 10. Button BAR Honda (B) + 1 lap 11. da Matta Toyota (M) + 2 laps 12. Verstappen Minardi Cosworth (B) + 3 laps 13. Kiesa Minardi Cosworth (B) + 4 laps Fastest Lap: Montoya, 1:22.095 - lap 37 Not Classified/Retirements: Driver Team On Lap Frentzen Sauber Petronas (B) 48 Wilson Jaguar Cosworth (M) 43 Baumgartner Jordan Ford (B) 35 Panis Toyota (M) 34 Fisichella Jordan Ford (B) 29 Barrichello Ferrari (B) 20 Villeneuve BAR Honda (B) 13 World Championship Standing, Round 13: Drivers: Constructors: 1. M.Schumacher 72 1. Williams-BMW 129 2. Montoya 71 2. Ferrari 121 3. Raikkonen 70 3. McLaren-Mercedes 115 4. R.Schumacher 58 4. Renault 78 5. Alonso 54 5. BAR-Honda 15 6. Barrichello 49 = Jaguar-Cosworth 15 7. Coulthard 45 7. Toyota 14 8. Trulli 24 8. Jordan-Ford 11 9. Webber 15 9. Sauber 9 10. Button 12 11. Fisichella 10 12. da Matta 8 13. Frentzen 7 14. Panis 6 15. Villeneuve 3 16. Heidfeld 2 17. Firman 1 All timing unofficial

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