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WRC Promoter backs FIA vision for WRC future

The World Rally Championship’s promoter says the FIA’s radical changes that includes plans to abandon hybrid-powered Rally1 cars and create a new promotion team as “positive proposals”.

Elfyn Evans, Scott Martin, Toyota Gazoo Racing WRT Toyota GR Yaris Rally1

Photo by: McKlein / Motorsport Images

The FIA has released its extensive vision for the WRC’s future at today’s World Motor Sport Council, which includes a raft of proposals designed to improve the championship.

Perhaps its most bold decision is to remove the control hybrid units from Rally1 cars for the 2025 season. Hybrid power formed a significant part of the new Rally1 regulations introduced in 2022 and the changes mean Rally1 cars in their current form won’t see out the original five-year homologation cycle.

The current Rally1 cars will continue to compete next season although without hybrid and a reduction in the air restrictor and aerodynamics, which is designed to cut costs. The original Rally1 car attracted a price tag of close to one million euros.

These changes will be ratified in June alongside a new set of Rally1 regulations that will be introduced from 2026 based on the Rally1 car concept, producing around 330 horsepower and capped at 400,000 euros.

In addition to the technical regulations, the FIA announced plans to form a WRC Promotion Team within the FIA in close collaboration with stakeholders from the WRC Promoter, event organisers and manufacturer teams "to leverage promotional opportunities around each event and maximise the WRC’s full potential".

Adrien Fourmaux, Alexandre Coria, M-Sport Ford World Rally Team Ford Puma Rally1

Adrien Fourmaux, Alexandre Coria, M-Sport Ford World Rally Team Ford Puma Rally1

Photo by: Red Bull Content Pool

There are also plans to allow organisers to adopt less rigid event formats, reduce liaison section distances and spread the reach of events, while remote service opportunities will be encouraged with teams permitted to carry limited parts in a small support vehicle. 

The changes have been well received by WRC Promoter, which gave its own submissions to the FIA but was not part of the decision-making process carried out by the FIA’s working group.

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“The World Motor Sport Council has made positive proposals that are the result of intensive discussions and are in our favour,” read a statement from WRC Promoter managing director Jona Siebel.

“As the exclusive Promoter of the World Rally Championship appointed by the FIA, we encourage the objectives put forward to allow us to continue growing this sport along with all stakeholders.”

WRC teams are yet to make any comments on the FIA’s future vision.

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