IMS IndyCar: Power claims first win of 2021 over Grosjean

Will Power overcame traffic and a late brace of cautions to secure his first IndyCar victory of 2021, beating Romain Grosjean at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway road course.

IMS IndyCar: Power claims first win of 2021 over Grosjean

Team Penske driver Power, having opened the race on the hard tyre, was able to clear polesitter Pato O’Ward following the opening pit phase.

With O’Ward then taking on the hard tyre, he posed little threat to the soft-shod Power, who opened up a seemingly unassailable lead over Colton Herta - the Andretti Autosport driver having relegated O’Ward down a further place.

Power was then stuck behind Herta's team-mate James Hinchcliffe after the second round of stops, the Canadian fighting the tide in attempting to remain on the lead lap.

Hinchcliffe’s recalcitrance allowed Herta to trim Power’s lead, which had stretched out to 9.5 seconds at its peak.

Attempting to clear Hinchcliffe by coming in early for his final pitstop, Power was dismayed to find Hinchcliffe also stopping ahead of him.

Just as Herta had closed to within two seconds of Power, with Grosjean in tow, the Honda engine in points leader Alex Palou’s Chip Ganassi Racing machine engine cried enough on lap 68 to bring out the race's first caution. 

Hinchcliffe was then moved to the back of the field to free up Power, whose main threat became Grosjean at the restart as the Dale Coyne Racing driver nipped past Herta at the first corner with a brave dive around the outside.

Power was able to keep a one-second buffer over Grosjean, but was then forced to contend with another caution as Rinus VeeKay (Ed Carpenter Racing) was thrust into a spin at Turn 7 by Power's team-mate Scott McLaughlin – leaving the Dutch driver requiring roadside assistance after stalling.

Patricio O'Ward, Arrow McLaren SP Chevrolet, Will Power, Team Penske Chevrolet, Romain Grosjean, Dale Coyne Racing with RWR Honda

Patricio O'Ward, Arrow McLaren SP Chevrolet, Will Power, Team Penske Chevrolet, Romain Grosjean, Dale Coyne Racing with RWR Honda

Photo by: Geoff Miller / Motorsport Images

But Power aced the restart and darted off into the lead, seeing out the remaining six laps to claim his 40th victory in the US open-wheel top flight.

Grosjean claimed second once more on the Indy road course, having done so at the previous race on the infield configuration back in May when VeeKay broke his duck.

Ex-F1 racer Grosjean saw off Herta’s final assault in the last few laps, leaving both drivers to hang on after both had used up all of their push-to-passes.

Alexander Rossi (Andretti Autosport) claimed his best result of the year in fourth, spending most of the race battling with Meyer-Shank Racing's Jack Harvey, although the two were separated by O’Ward at the flag.

Graham Rahal finished seventh, as Penske's Josef Newgarden overcame a six-place grid penalty for an unapproved engine change - that meant he started 20th - to claim eighth despite a late skirmish with Takuma Sato (Rahal Letterman Lanigan).

Nashville winner Marcus Ericsson was able to take advantage of the duo’s contact at Turn 1 to claim ninth, leaving Sato to complete the top 10.

Rookie driver Christian Lundgaard, making his first appearance in IndyCar, could not follow up on his impressive qualifying pace. After starting fourth, the RLL driver lost a number of spots throughout the race and slumped to 12th at the flag after a difficult mid-race stint on the hard tyre.

Palou’s retirement means that his points lead has been cut to just 21 points over O’Ward, with four rounds remaining.

Indianapolis GP II race results - 85 laps

Cla Driver Team Time Gap
1 Australia Will Power United States Team Penske 1:49'38.081  
2 France Romain Grosjean United States Dale Coyne Racing 1:49'39.195 1.114
3 United States Colton Herta United States Andretti Autosport 1:49'40.430 2.349
4 United States Alexander Rossi United States Andretti Autosport 1:49'41.519 3.438
5 Mexico Patricio O'Ward United States Arrow McLaren SP 1:49'42.186 4.105
6 United Kingdom Jack Harvey United States Meyer Shank Racing 1:49'43.404 5.323
7 United States Graham Rahal United States Rahal Letterman Lanigan Racing 1:49'43.936 5.855
8 United States Josef Newgarden United States Team Penske 1:49'44.330 6.249
9 Sweden Marcus Ericsson United States Chip Ganassi Racing 1:49'45.089 7.008
10 Japan Takuma Sato United States Rahal Letterman Lanigan Racing 1:49'46.026 7.944
11 United States Conor Daly United States Ed Carpenter Racing 1:49'47.440 9.359
12 Denmark Christian Lundgaard United States Rahal Letterman Lanigan Racing 1:49'47.919 9.837
13 Sweden Felix Rosenqvist United States Arrow McLaren SP 1:49'48.704 10.623
14 United Arab Emirates Ed Jones United States Dale Coyne Racing 1:49'50.201 12.119
15 France Sébastien Bourdais United States A.J. Foyt Enterprises 1:49'50.659 12.578
16 France Simon Pagenaud United States Team Penske 1:49'54.498 16.416
17 New Zealand Scott Dixon United States Chip Ganassi Racing 1:49'55.273 17.192
18 United States Ryan Hunter-Reay United States Andretti Autosport 1:49'55.408 17.327
19 United States Jimmie Johnson United States Chip Ganassi Racing 1:49'56.239 18.158
20 United Kingdom Max Chilton United Kingdom Carlin 1:49'56.830 18.748
21 Brazil Helio Castroneves United States Meyer Shank Racing 1:49'57.626 19.545
22 Canada James Hinchcliffe United States Andretti Autosport 1:49'58.926 20.845
23 New Zealand Scott McLaughlin United States Team Penske 1:49'59.092 21.011
24 Netherlands Rinus van Kalmthout United States Ed Carpenter Racing 1:50'00.575 22.494
25 United States Cody Ware United States Dale Coyne Racing 1:50'04.525 2 Laps
26 Canada Dalton Kellett United States A.J. Foyt Enterprises 1:50'12.230 4 Laps
27 Spain Alex Palou United States Chip Ganassi Racing 1:23'45.393 18 Laps
28 United States R.C. Enerson Top Gun Racing 26'30.114 73 Laps
shares
comments
Rookie Lundgaard surprised by pace on IndyCar debut at IMS

Previous article

Rookie Lundgaard surprised by pace on IndyCar debut at IMS

Next article

Palou stays positive on IndyCar title hopes despite IMS engine failure

Palou stays positive on IndyCar title hopes despite IMS engine failure
Load comments
Have Harvey and RLL formed IndyCar’s next winning match-up? Plus

Have Harvey and RLL formed IndyCar’s next winning match-up?

Despite appearing to have an IndyCar job for life with Meyer Shank Racing, Jack Harvey’s departure and move to Rahal Letterman Lanigan Racing sparked plenty of debate. However, Harvey's and RLL's combined strengths could prove to be a winning combination - if they get the balance right

IndyCar
Oct 17, 2021
Remembering Dan Wheldon and his last and most amazing IndyCar win Plus

Remembering Dan Wheldon and his last and most amazing IndyCar win

Saturday 16 October marks the 10th anniversary of Dan Wheldon’s death. David Malsher-Lopez pays tribute, then asks Wheldon’s race engineer from 2011, Todd Malloy, to recall that magical second victory at the Indianapolis 500

IndyCar
Oct 16, 2021
Why Kyle Kirkwood is America's new IndyCar ace-in-waiting Plus

Why Kyle Kirkwood is America's new IndyCar ace-in-waiting

Kyle Kirkwood, the record-setting junior formula driver, sealed the Indy Lights championship last weekend. But despite an absurdly strong junior career and scholarship money, his next move is far from clear

IndyCar
Oct 6, 2021
Why IndyCar title glory is just the start for Ganassi's new star Plus

Why IndyCar title glory is just the start for Ganassi's new star

Newly-crowned IndyCar champion Alex Palou has been lauded as a complete driver and veteran-like in only his second season. The 24-year-old is still in the early days of his career, but the parallels are there for all to see with his six-time champion Chip Ganassi Racing team-mate who has been CGR's team leader since 2014

IndyCar
Sep 28, 2021
Why Grosjean's oval commitment shows he's serious about IndyCar Plus

Why Grosjean's oval commitment shows he's serious about IndyCar

One of motorsport’s worst-kept secrets is now out in the open, and Romain Grosjean has been confirmed as an Andretti Autosport IndyCar driver in 2022. It marks a remarkable turnaround after the abrupt end to his Formula 1 career, and is a firm indication of his commitment to challenge for the IndyCar Series title  

IndyCar
Sep 24, 2021
Why IndyCar’s longest silly-season is still far from over Plus

Why IndyCar’s longest silly-season is still far from over

OPINION: The 2021 IndyCar silly season has been one of the silliest for many years, as many talented drivers remain in play – with new pieces to the puzzle being added all the time. Here's what we know so far about who will end up where in 2022

IndyCar
Sep 15, 2021
Why IndyCar's generational shift isn't as stark as it appears Plus

Why IndyCar's generational shift isn't as stark as it appears

OPINION: The rise of two drivers racing only their second full-season IndyCar campaigns to head the points with four races to go has led to some observers doubting the credentials of the old guard. But they haven't faded away, there's merely a deeper talent pool that is helping to make this season one of the best in recent years

IndyCar
Aug 20, 2021
The F1 champion who became an Indy king in his second career Plus

The F1 champion who became an Indy king in his second career

Emerson Fittipaldi’s decision to go racing with his brother led to him falling out of F1, but he bloomed again on the IndyCar scene. NIGEL ROEBUCK considers a career of two halves

Formula 1
Jul 31, 2021