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Maranello, Italy. Enzo Ferrari shakes the hand of new driver, Didier Pironi with Gilles and Joann Villeneuve looking on.
Maranello, Italy. Enzo Ferrari shakes the hand of new driver, Didier Pironi with Gilles and Joann Villeneuve looking on.
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When Enzo Ferrari signed Niki Lauda for the 1974 season, many were surprised. This is Ferrari attending Lauda’s first test at Fiorano. He went on to spearhead Scuderia Ferrari’s mid-1970s revival.
When Enzo Ferrari signed Niki Lauda for the 1974 season, many were surprised. This is Ferrari attending Lauda’s first test at Fiorano. He went on to spearhead Scuderia Ferrari’s mid-1970s revival.
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Enzo Ferrari was born in Modena in Italy on February 18 1898. He was bitten by the racing bug when he attended the Circuito di Bologna race at the age of 10, and after surviving World War One and being discharged after suffering from a bout of pleurisy that could have killed him, he turned his attention to making a name for himself in automobile racing.
Enzo Ferrari was born in Modena in Italy on February 18 1898. He was bitten by the racing bug when he attended the Circuito di Bologna race at the age of 10, and after surviving World War One and being discharged after suffering from a bout of pleurisy that could have killed him, he turned his attention to making a name for himself in automobile racing.
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Enzo Ferrari made his customary visit to Monza during practice, here with Mauro Forghieri. Italian GP, Monza, 5 September 1971
Enzo Ferrari made his customary visit to Monza during practice, here with Mauro Forghieri. Italian GP, Monza, 5 September 1971
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It’s often forgotten that Enzo Ferrari was a racing driver in his own right. He’s pictured here in his Alfa Romeo at the 1920 Targa Florio, where he finished second and won his class. He raced from 1919 to 1931, with his biggest victory coming in the inaugural Coppa Acerbo at Pescara in 1924.
It’s often forgotten that Enzo Ferrari was a racing driver in his own right. He’s pictured here in his Alfa Romeo at the 1920 Targa Florio, where he finished second and won his class. He raced from 1919 to 1931, with his biggest victory coming in the inaugural Coppa Acerbo at Pescara in 1924.
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Enzo Ferrari died on 14 August 1988 at the age of 90 in his home in Modena and was buried in a private funeral attended only by those closest to him the following morning.
Enzo Ferrari died on 14 August 1988 at the age of 90 in his home in Modena and was buried in a private funeral attended only by those closest to him the following morning.
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Scuderia Ferrari took its first world championship with Mike Hawthorn in 1958. But it was a tragic season for Ferrari, who lost his other two frontline drivers – Luigi Musso and Peter Collins – that season.
Scuderia Ferrari took its first world championship with Mike Hawthorn in 1958. But it was a tragic season for Ferrari, who lost his other two frontline drivers – Luigi Musso and Peter Collins – that season.
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More tragedy struck in 1961. This is Ferrari at Monza in 1961 prior to the death of his driver, Wolfgang von Trips in the race. Phil Hill won the championship for Ferrari.
More tragedy struck in 1961. This is Ferrari at Monza in 1961 prior to the death of his driver, Wolfgang von Trips in the race. Phil Hill won the championship for Ferrari.
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Enzo Ferrari often had a mixed relationship with drivers. Here he is pictured with John Surtees in 1964, the year they won the world championship together. In 1966, Surtees walked out on the team.
Enzo Ferrari often had a mixed relationship with drivers. Here he is pictured with John Surtees in 1964, the year they won the world championship together. In 1966, Surtees walked out on the team.
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Enzo’s team claimed its first Le Mans 24 Hours victory in 1949 with Luigi Chinetti and Peter Mitchell-Thompson. They drove a Ferrari 166 MM, which was derived from the 125 S.
Enzo’s team claimed its first Le Mans 24 Hours victory in 1949 with Luigi Chinetti and Peter Mitchell-Thompson. They drove a Ferrari 166 MM, which was derived from the 125 S.
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Enzo Ferrari closed Scuderia Ferrari at the start of 1938 and went to work for Alfa Romeo to run its in-house racing team. He was sacked in 1939, but only after overseeing the design and production of the Alfa Romeo 158 ‘voiturette’ that went on to win the first two world championship in 1950-51.
Enzo Ferrari closed Scuderia Ferrari at the start of 1938 and went to work for Alfa Romeo to run its in-house racing team. He was sacked in 1939, but only after overseeing the design and production of the Alfa Romeo 158 ‘voiturette’ that went on to win the first two world championship in 1950-51.
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Ferrari rarely left the Maranello/Modena area in his final four decades, but did appear regularly in the Monza paddock during the Italian Grand Prix weekend. Here he is in 1967.
Ferrari rarely left the Maranello/Modena area in his final four decades, but did appear regularly in the Monza paddock during the Italian Grand Prix weekend. Here he is in 1967.
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Enzo Ferrari, pictured during the 1960 Italian Grand Prix weekend with fellow team bosses John Cooper, Raymond Mays, Colin Chapma and Lofty England.
Enzo Ferrari, pictured during the 1960 Italian Grand Prix weekend with fellow team bosses John Cooper, Raymond Mays, Colin Chapma and Lofty England.
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Scuderia Ferrari took its first world championship race win in the 1951 British Grand Prix, which was won by Argentinian Jose Froilan Gonzalez. Famously, star driver Alberto Ascari was offered the chance to take over that car after retiring, but declined given how well Gonzalez was driving.
Scuderia Ferrari took its first world championship race win in the 1951 British Grand Prix, which was won by Argentinian Jose Froilan Gonzalez. Famously, star driver Alberto Ascari was offered the chance to take over that car after retiring, but declined given how well Gonzalez was driving.
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Probably the last of the great Scuderia Ferrari drivers of Enzo’s lifetime was Gilles Villeneuve. The pair are pictured together here in September 1980.
Probably the last of the great Scuderia Ferrari drivers of Enzo’s lifetime was Gilles Villeneuve. The pair are pictured together here in September 1980.
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In the first world championship race held after Enzo Ferrari’s death was made public, Gerhard Berger led home Michele Alboreto for a Ferrari one-two in the 1988 Italian Grand Prix.
In the first world championship race held after Enzo Ferrari’s death was made public, Gerhard Berger led home Michele Alboreto for a Ferrari one-two in the 1988 Italian Grand Prix.
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Key to Ferrari’s success during the 1970s was Luca di Montezemolo (far left). This picture is from a Goodyear/Ferrari press conference in 1975.
Key to Ferrari’s success during the 1970s was Luca di Montezemolo (far left). This picture is from a Goodyear/Ferrari press conference in 1975.
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Scuderia Ferrari first existed in the pre-Second World War years primarily to run Alfa Romeo’s cars. This is Tazio Nuvolari on his way to one of the great victories in the 1935 German Grand Prix driving a Ferrari-run Alfa Romeo Tipo B-P3. Enzo considered him the greatest driver of all.
Scuderia Ferrari first existed in the pre-Second World War years primarily to run Alfa Romeo’s cars. This is Tazio Nuvolari on his way to one of the great victories in the 1935 German Grand Prix driving a Ferrari-run Alfa Romeo Tipo B-P3. Enzo considered him the greatest driver of all.
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Enzo Ferrari during testing at Imola, making what would be his final visit to a Ferrari Formula 1 pit garage.
Enzo Ferrari during testing at Imola, making what would be his final visit to a Ferrari Formula 1 pit garage.
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Scuderia Ferrari was created for the second time in 1947 with the completion of the legendary marque’s first car – the 125 S. Enzo Ferrari was the first to drive it on a short trip and it went on to make its racing debut in the Circuito di Piacenza, leading in the hands of Franco Cortese but retiring. Enzo dubbed it a “promising failure”.
Scuderia Ferrari was created for the second time in 1947 with the completion of the legendary marque’s first car – the 125 S. Enzo Ferrari was the first to drive it on a short trip and it went on to make its racing debut in the Circuito di Piacenza, leading in the hands of Franco Cortese but retiring. Enzo dubbed it a “promising failure”.
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