Video guide: Azerbaijan Grand Prix's Baku F1 street circuit

The crucial sections of the Azerbaijan Grand Prix's Baku Formula 1 circuit are examined by Peter Windsor in this week's episode of The Motorsport Show

Video guide: Azerbaijan Grand Prix's Baku F1 street circuit

Baku's odd juxtaposition of an extremely long start/finish straight and a more traditional street circuit layout make it a unique addition to the F1 calendar.

Windsor highlights Turn 1, where drivers brake from speeds of more than 230mph, as "by far the most interesting part of the lap".

"It's approached at such high speed and it narrows on exit, it's very deceiving for drivers," says Windsor.

"The tyres and brakes may be a little cooler than they should be because of that long straight.

"If it's a restart, you're really in trouble there. That's what made Daniel Ricciardo's pass on the two Williams at the second start last year so impressive.

"The other point to remember here is there will be a lot of lift and coast, it's pretty tough on fuel, so the drivers will be backing off to save fuel into the braking area.

"It will define the final third of the race."

Turn 1 and the other three 90-degree corners that make up the first sector are much more conventional of a street circuit.

Baku gets more original in the middle sector, with the tight, winding complex from Turns 8-12, which Windsor says requires "very precise judgement and very good kerb striking".

The end of the lap is "where it really becomes difficult as a race track", though, in particular through the downhill Turn 15 right-hander and 90-degree Turn 16 left.

This was the scene of the infamous collision between Sebastian Vettel and Lewis Hamilton under the safety car last year, which Windsor believes is a consequence of the circuit's long start-finish straight.

"It's very, very difficult to get the timing right at a restart," he says.

"This is probably the most crucial part of the circuit bearing in mind we are almost certainly going to have a safety car."

Windsor also believes this part of the lap will be susceptible to both crosswinds and tailwinds coming onto the straight because it borders the Caspian Sea.

According to Windsor, "that means we're in Daniel Ricciardo, Lewis Hamilton sort of territory".

shares
comments
Stoffel Vandoorne feels he can perform like Fernando Alonso now
Previous article

Stoffel Vandoorne feels he can perform like Fernando Alonso now

Next article

F1's major engine controversy explained

F1's major engine controversy explained
Can Hamilton produce another Singapore magic moment? Plus

Can Hamilton produce another Singapore magic moment?

The Singapore Grand Prix has, explains BEN EDWARDS, played an important role in Lewis Hamilton’s Formula 1 career. As the series returns to the Marina Bay Street Circuit for the first time in three years, he faces the latest challenge with an underperforming Mercedes car

Why Sainz is key to Ferrari achieving its chairman's F1 goals Plus

Why Sainz is key to Ferrari achieving its chairman's F1 goals

Although Ferrari's chances of title glory in 2022 have evaporated, chairman John Elkann expects the team to have chalked up both championships by 2026. Both require drivers to play the team game and, having now become more comfortable with the F1-75, Carlos Sainz may be Ferrari's key to title glory

Formula 1
Sep 27, 2022
How F1 has tried to avoid repeating its 2014 engine rules mistakes Plus

How F1 has tried to avoid repeating its 2014 engine rules mistakes

With Formula 1’s future engine regulations now agreed, MARK GALLAGHER wonders if they will provide a more competitive field than past attempts actually managed

Formula 1
Sep 26, 2022
How its faltering first turbo car advanced a Williams-Honda glory era Plus

How its faltering first turbo car advanced a Williams-Honda glory era

STUART CODLING charts the development of the Williams FW09, the ugly duckling that heralded the start of the title-winning Williams-Honda partnership

Formula 1
Sep 25, 2022
The Moss-Ferrari farce that current F1 drivers are thankfully spared Plus

The Moss-Ferrari farce that current F1 drivers are thankfully spared

Recent moves within the driver market have reminded MAURICE HAMILTON of a time when contracts weren’t worth the paper they weren’t written on…

Formula 1
Sep 24, 2022
Audi’s innovative first assault on grand prix racing Plus

Audi’s innovative first assault on grand prix racing

It has been a long time coming but Audi’s arrival in Formula 1 is finally on the horizon for 2026. But it won’t be its first foray into grand prix racing, as the German manufacturer giant has a history both long and enthralling

Formula 1
Sep 23, 2022
The seven factors powering Verstappen's 2022 F1 domination Plus

The seven factors powering Verstappen's 2022 F1 domination

After a tooth and nail and, at times, toxic Formula 1 world championship scrap last year, Max Verstappen's march to a second consecutive title has been the exact opposite. But has he really changed in 2022? Here's a dive into what factors have played a crucial role, both inside the Verstappen camp and elsewhere, in the Dutch driver's domination

Formula 1
Sep 23, 2022
Why Hamilton is still the man to keep driving Mercedes forward Plus

Why Hamilton is still the man to keep driving Mercedes forward

Lewis Hamilton’s words in a recent Vanity Fair interview define both his world-view and his approach to this season: one of perpetual struggle against adversity. As GP RACING explains, that’s what Lewis feeds off – and why, far from being down and nearly out, he’s using his unique skillset to spearhead Mercedes’ revival…

Formula 1
Sep 22, 2022