Ron Dennis: I'm still right man to lead McLaren-Honda F1 team

Ron Dennis is adamant he remains the right man to lead McLaren into the future despite the fact the team is enduring the worst run in its Formula 1 history

Ron Dennis: I'm still right man to lead McLaren-Honda F1 team

McLaren's abysmal 2015 campaign with Honda means the team has now failed to win for 57 races, stretching back to the final grand prix of 2012 in Brazil, while it has not won a constructors' title since 1998.

Dennis has at least helped transform McLaren off track given its growth in the high-end car sector, and several other areas away from the motor racing and automotive side of the business, but he knows he is judged on McLaren's F1 exploits.

Asked whether he was fit for the job, Dennis said: "I feel I am extremely healthy, as far as I know. I look after myself, I don't get 'falling over' tired.

"I am highly motivated, and I will die with ambition. I will always be ambitious.

"Formula 1 is changing, but it isn't my challenge. It's a challenge where I choose the right people to do a particular job.

"That's the challenge in any business, to make sure you choose leaders. You don't always get it right, but that's the challenge.

"Be under no illusion: I am as motivated and as focused as I've ever been, and I'm contributing to the future of McLaren, and that's my objective.

"Providing my visions are shared, then this is where I'll be."

Dennis is convinced the right people are being put in place to ensure McLaren will succeed again.

"First of all, the responsibility of the performance of the cars and how they run at the circuit are not mine," said Dennis.

"I still have a firm belief we have one the best teams of people we've had for quite a long time.

"Our engineering group is also highly motivated, focused. Do I believe we've got people who have the ability to do the job? Yes I do.

"I didn't feel that a year ago, or the year before, but inevitably, we're now not only in a competitive world with regard to engine and chassis, but also people.

"Formula 1 has learned the art of 'lock up' because you are talking about waiting a year for a top person, and teams are wealthy enough to sit them on gardening leave for a year.

"We've done a lot of work to improve our technical group, and as time passes by you'll see our efforts on that start to unfold.

"If I had to weigh up who we have joining the team over the next two years against who we've lost over the last two years, then the balance is heavily in favour of the future."

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