Points adjustment set to be discussed

Alterations to the new-for-2010 Formula 1 points system are still possible, with the topic set to be discussed at a forthcoming Formula 1 Commission meeting

Points adjustment set to be discussed

In December last year the FIA's World Motor Sport Council approved an F1 Commission proposal that the top ten finishers in each race should score under a 25-20-15-10-8-6-5-3-2-1 distribution to reflect the fact that the grid was growing from 20 to 26 cars in 2010.

But Ferrari team boss Stefano Domenicali confirmed at the Wrooom ski meeting today that this may yet be adjusted, amid suggestions of a minor tweak to give a greater percentage separation between the first and second place scores.

"There's going to be a meeting in the next couple of weeks to reconsider some items of the regulations, among which is the scoring system," he said.

"In the agenda we do not only have the fact that we have to re-seed the scoring system, but also there may be other issues that may be important, linked to the use of tyres, linked to the number of pitstops. This is going to be defined by the end of January.

"There's going to be a meeting of the Formula 1 Commission, I think it's going to be 1 February. Then we have to give some time to our fans, the media and all those involved, to understand what these changes are going to be. This issue is not stable yet. To date I cannot anticipate anything because we still have to discuss it."

He does not expect any major changes to the Q1/Q2/Q3 qualifying format, but hinted at small adjustments to make the system work with the 2010 race format, under which mid-race refuelling is removed.

"[Qualifying] should remain the same as a system," said Domenicali. "Clearly the cars will do qualifying without a fuel load. The discussion is about the tyres which can be used and if the tyres used in Q3 have to be used at the start of the race."

He believes that all parties involved in F1 also need to finalise a long-term strategy for the championship during the early part of this year.

"2013 is very close. We're going to have new challenges then," Domenicali said. "From a technical point of view we're going to have to review the car concept with a view also of the new environmental needs and the new technologies that have to be implemented not only in the automotive world but in the sports world.

"We're going to have to renegotiate the commercial agreement. We have many issues that we have to tackle, so in the coming weeks we're going to have to put down an agenda in FOTA with our priorities."

Domenicali suggested that a relaxation of the new strict testing restrictions should also be discussed in the near future.

"I think we have gone too much under the limit," he said. "For example with Michael [Schumacher] - that he has to use GP2 shows that clearly we have to make some changes.

"We believe we have to reconsider this again, with a goal of cutting down costs of course. But there is also safety for young drivers and the need of having to work on the race track. If we limit the costs on one hand we increase the costs in other areas. One of the activities the FOTA teams have to tackle is how to increase the number of tests, I think it is necessary to do so."

He also thinks that the issue of teams running third cars could be revisited if some of the new squads joining F1 in 2010 run into trouble.

"We're going to have to understand how these teams are going to be, if they're going to follow up on their programme," Domenicali said. "We've seen many meteorites in the past, and we need stars that stick in the sky.

"As for the third car, we have always been in favour of this possibility, and I think this follows up on the interest of our fans who want to see big teams with big names.

"We think this could be discussed again should things go differently, should there be a situation in which some teams may not be as sturdy as they have presented themselves. From this point of view, we've always said that a third car could be a possibility for allowing Formula 1 to grow."

shares
comments
Ferrari: Alonso can defeat Schumacher

Previous article

Ferrari: Alonso can defeat Schumacher

Next article

Domenicali admits pressure is on

Domenicali admits pressure is on
Load comments
The new age of sponsorship facilitated by F1’s relevancy push Plus

The new age of sponsorship facilitated by F1’s relevancy push

The age of the high-profile title sponsor is over, says JONATHAN NOBLE, but Formula 1’s commitment to technological innovation is attracting high-tech partners

How Britain’s lost Ferrari star epitomised a bygone F1 era Plus

How Britain’s lost Ferrari star epitomised a bygone F1 era

The 1956 Italian Grand Prix was over for Juan Manuel Fangio, along with his hopes of winning the world championship – until his Ferrari team-mate (and title rival) voluntarily surrendered his own car so Fangio could continue. NIGEL ROEBUCK recalls Peter Collins, a remarkable sportsman

Formula 1
Jun 19, 2021
The 'surprise' Mercedes time that puts F1's victory fight back on a knife-edge in France Plus

The 'surprise' Mercedes time that puts F1's victory fight back on a knife-edge in France

Red Bull led the way after the first two practice sessions for the 2021 French Grand Prix, but only just ahead of Mercedes. There was all the usual practice skulduggery complicating the performance picture, but one aspect seen at the world champion squad gave it a ‘surprise’ lift, as it looks to leave its street-circuit struggles firmly in the past

Formula 1
Jun 18, 2021
How Ferrari got its F1 recovery plan working Plus

How Ferrari got its F1 recovery plan working

After its worst campaign in 40 years, the famous Italian team had to bounce back in 2021 – and it appears to be delivering. Although it concedes the pole positions in Monaco and Baku paint a somewhat misleading picture of its competitiveness, the team is heading into the 2022 rules revamp on much stronger footing to go for wins again

Formula 1
Jun 18, 2021
The joy that exposes F1’s key weakness Plus

The joy that exposes F1’s key weakness

Long-awaited wins for ex-Formula 1 drivers Marcus Ericsson and Kevin Magnussen in IndyCar and IMSA last weekend gave F1 a reminder of what it is missing. But with the new rules aimed at levelling the playing field, there’s renewed optimism that more drivers can have a rewarding result when their day of days comes

Formula 1
Jun 17, 2021
The figures Red Bull and Mercedes can't afford to see again in F1 2021 Plus

The figures Red Bull and Mercedes can't afford to see again in F1 2021

OPINION: An interloper squad got amongst the title contenders during Formula 1’s street-circuit mini-break, where Red Bull left with the points lead in both championships. But, as the campaign heads back to purpose-built venues once again, how the drivers of the two top teams compare in one crucial area will be a major factor in deciding which squad stays in or retakes the top spot

Formula 1
Jun 16, 2021
Why Alfa's boss is ready for the task of securing a stronger F1 future Plus

Why Alfa's boss is ready for the task of securing a stronger F1 future

Two tenth places in recent races have lifted Alfa Romeo to the head of Formula 1's 'Class C' battle in 2021, but longer-term the Swiss-based squad has far loftier ambitions. With the new 2022 rules set to level out the playing field, team boss Frederic Vasseur has good reason to be optimistic, as he explained to Autosport in an exclusive interview

Formula 1
Jun 15, 2021
How Barnard’s revolutionary McLaren transformed F1 car construction Plus

How Barnard’s revolutionary McLaren transformed F1 car construction

The MP4/1 was pioneering by choice, but a McLaren by chance. STUART CODLING relates the tangled (carbonfibre) weaves which led to the creation of one of motor racing’s defining cars

Formula 1
Jun 15, 2021