Motorsport UK's Richards: Some F1 teams have heads in sand over Brexit

Formula 1 teams cannot risk having their "heads in the sand" over the risk of Britain leaving the European Union without a deal, says Motorsport UK's David Richards

Motorsport UK's Richards: Some F1 teams have heads in sand over Brexit

Britain is due to leave the EU on March 29 but there is still no deal in place for customs or trade arrangements - among other things - with member states, as the government is struggling to win the necessary Parliamentary support to back its EU withdrawal agreement.

This could create major problems for F1 teams travelling to European countries, which host nine of the 10 races from mid-May to early September.

Some, like Mercedes and Renault, have been very vocal about their concerns but, as the Brexit deadline approaches, ex-F1 team boss and British motorsport governing body chairman Richards is concerned not all teams have fully considered the consequences of a no-deal Brexit.

"There are a few that clearly have a strong position on this and share my concerns," Richards told Autosport.

"There are others who, perhaps for their own internal reasons, don't wish to make a fuss about it at the moment. One hopes they have contingency plans.

"But there might be some that still have their heads in the sand about it. That, I would caution against.

"Two or three of them have been very clear that they are concerned about this.

"The others are showing less of a concern."

The latest Parliament discussion over Brexit is due to take place on Thursday but no further progress is expected to be made.

That is likely to remain the case until February 27 at the earliest, to give British prime minister Theresa May more time to negotiate changes to the EU-approved withdrawal agreement and gain the necessary support from MPs.

But senior EU figures have consistently said they will not alter the deal, prompting growing calls for a second referendum or for May to try to extend the Brexit deadline to prevent crashing out without a deal.

Richards reiterated that the chief short-term concern is the impact a no-deal Brexit would have on moving goods and people across European borders for any team that competes in F1 or another series racing abroad.

He pledged that Motorsport UK would be there "as a governing body to help, assist and do everything we can to smooth a way through that, and we'll help with dealings with government where appropriate".

"We must all keep our fingers crossed and hope the matters get resolved by our politicians but if they don't then I don't see it being very straightforward at all to bring equipment and personnel in and out," said Richards.

"I'm sure we can resolve these things in time, but the first few months of this transition is going to be very fraught.

"We'd better start to plan for that because if it does go in that direction there's going to be a very big logistical exercise for any team to operate going in and out of this country."

shares
comments
Raikkonen: Leclerc will thrive if he avoids Ferrari F1 team hassle
Previous article

Raikkonen: Leclerc will thrive if he avoids Ferrari F1 team hassle

Next article

First pictures of Alfa Romeo 2019 Formula 1 car on track

First pictures of Alfa Romeo 2019 Formula 1 car on track
Load comments
The “glorified taxi” driver central to F1’s continued safety push Plus

The “glorified taxi” driver central to F1’s continued safety push

As the driver of Formula 1’s medical car, Alan van der Merwe’s job is to wait – and hope his skills aren’t needed. JAMES NEWBOLD hears from F1’s lesser-known stalwarts

Formula 1
Jan 15, 2022
When BMW added F1 'rocket fuel' to ignite Brabham's 1983 title push Plus

When BMW added F1 'rocket fuel' to ignite Brabham's 1983 title push

There was an ace up the sleeve during the 1983 F1 title-winning season of Nelson Piquet and Brabham. It made a frontrunning car invincible for the last three races to see off Renault's Alain Prost and secure the combination's second world title in three years

Formula 1
Jan 13, 2022
How “abysmal” reliability blunted Brabham’s first winner Plus

How “abysmal” reliability blunted Brabham’s first winner

Brabham’s first world championship race-winning car was held back by unreliable Climax engines – or so its creators believed, as STUART CODLING explains

Formula 1
Jan 10, 2022
The steps Norris took to reach a new level in F1 2021 Plus

The steps Norris took to reach a new level in F1 2021

Lando Norris came of age as a grand prix driver in 2021. McLaren’s young ace is no longer an apprentice or a quietly capable number two – he’s proved himself a potential winner in the top flight and, as STUART CODLING finds out, he’s ready to stake his claim to greatness…

Formula 1
Jan 9, 2022
The original F1 maestro who set the bar for Schumacher and Hamilton Plus

The original F1 maestro who set the bar for Schumacher and Hamilton

Juan Manuel Fangio, peerless on track and charming off it, established the gold standard of grand prix greatness. NIGEL ROEBUCK recalls a remarkable champion

Formula 1
Jan 8, 2022
How Russell sees his place in the Mercedes-Hamilton F1 superteam Plus

How Russell sees his place in the Mercedes-Hamilton F1 superteam

George Russell joining Lewis Hamilton at Mercedes this year gives it arguably the best line-up in Formula 1 – if it can avoid too many fireworks. After serving his apprenticeship at Williams, Russell is the man that Mercedes team believes can lead it in the post-Hamilton era, but how will he fare against the seven-time champion? Autosport heard from the man himself

Formula 1
Jan 6, 2022
How F1 pulled off its second pandemic season and its 2022 implications Plus

How F1 pulled off its second pandemic season and its 2022 implications

OPINION: The Formula 1 season just gone was the second to be completed under the dreaded shadow of the COVID-19 pandemic, but in many ways it was much more ‘normal’ than 2020. Here’s the story of how the championship’s various organisers delivered a second challenging campaign, which offers a glimpse at what may be different next time around

Formula 1
Jan 5, 2022
The adapt or die mentality that will shape F1's future Plus

The adapt or die mentality that will shape F1's future

As attitudes towards the motor car and what powers it change, Formula 1 must adapt its offering. MARK GALLAGHER ponders the end of fossil fuels

Formula 1
Jan 3, 2022