Leclerc questions why Ferrari’s efforts in taming F1 porpoising should be wasted

Charles Leclerc does not understand why Ferrari’s hard work in taming porpoising on its Formula 1 car should be thrown ‘in the bin’ because of rivals’ calls for FIA intervention.

Leclerc questions why Ferrari’s efforts in taming F1 porpoising should be wasted

A number of drivers, in particular MercedesGeorge Russell, last weekend urged motor racing’s governing body to work to get rid of the bouncing phenomenon from the current generation of cars because of health and safety concerns.

The FIA responded almost immediately with a new technical directive issued to teams ahead of the Canadian Grand Prix that detailed an action plan.

As well as beginning a data gathering exercise to try to create a maximum allowance for a car’s vertical acceleration and bouncing, teams have been allowed to make minor tweaks to their floors from this weekend’s race to help strengthen them.

The competitive order impact of the changes, as well as any restrictions that the FIA may impose in the future with regards to car setup, is unclear right now – but teams that are suffering less porpoising are not overjoyed about the potential for them to suffer as well.

And Leclerc, in particular, is irritated that Ferrari may lose the advantage it has made from working to solve the problem just because other teams have not got to grip with matters.

Asked by Autosport about the FIA’s involvement in the porpoising debate, Leclerc said: “On the one hand, I obviously understand George's point, because when you see him and Lewis get out of their car after Baku, it's very bad.

“You can feel probably the pain that Lewis is going through at the moment. And this is not acceptable.

“But, on the other hand, also, you cannot underestimate the amount of work that's been done in the last few months by teams to actually get on top of those issues. This has been our main priority since the first time we tried these cars.

Carlos Sainz, Ferrari F1-75

Carlos Sainz, Ferrari F1-75

Photo by: Patrick Vinet / Sutton images

“We've been working to get on top of those issues. I think the improvement has been massive, and now all of the work that we've done, [do we] just put it in the bin because obviously there's maybe one team that is struggling more than others.

“This is my point of view. I obviously understand that on Mercedes it's very bad, but I also think that there are maybe fixes for this.”

Russell, who led calls in the drivers’ briefing in Baku for the FIA to step in, explained that it was far too early to suggest that teams could lose any competitive edge through the latest action.

“At the end of the day, the FIA are the rule makers, and they could bring in any regulation change they want,” he said. “Nobody sat here knows if that's going to improve their performance or have a negative effect on their performance. So, we really have to see.

“There's so many different aspects and elements of these cars, that by raising the car, it doesn't necessarily reduce it or remove. You're going in between porpoising and bottoming: it's two sort-of different issues at play here.

“I hope it's easier to drive for everybody and it doesn't have a knock-on effect for performance for anyone.”

shares
comments
Podcast: The key talking points from practice as F1 returns to Canada
Previous article

Podcast: The key talking points from practice as F1 returns to Canada

Next article

The long-run data that offers Ferrari hope in Canada amid Leclerc engine pain

The long-run data that offers Ferrari hope in Canada amid Leclerc engine pain
Why Sainz is key to Ferrari achieving its chairman's F1 goals Plus

Why Sainz is key to Ferrari achieving its chairman's F1 goals

Although Ferrari's chances of title glory in 2022 have evaporated, chairman John Elkann expects the team to have chalked up both championships by 2026. Both require drivers to play the team game and, having now become more comfortable with the F1-75, Carlos Sainz may be Ferrari's key to title glory

How F1 has tried to avoid repeating its 2014 engine rules mistakes Plus

How F1 has tried to avoid repeating its 2014 engine rules mistakes

With Formula 1’s future engine regulations now agreed, MARK GALLAGHER wonders if they will provide a more competitive field than past attempts actually managed

Formula 1
Sep 26, 2022
How its faltering first turbo car advanced a Williams-Honda glory era Plus

How its faltering first turbo car advanced a Williams-Honda glory era

STUART CODLING charts the development of the Williams FW09, the ugly duckling that heralded the start of the title-winning Williams-Honda partnership

Formula 1
Sep 25, 2022
The Moss-Ferrari farce that current F1 drivers are thankfully spared Plus

The Moss-Ferrari farce that current F1 drivers are thankfully spared

Recent moves within the driver market have reminded MAURICE HAMILTON of a time when contracts weren’t worth the paper they weren’t written on…

Formula 1
Sep 24, 2022
Audi’s innovative first assault on grand prix racing Plus

Audi’s innovative first assault on grand prix racing

It has been a long time coming but Audi’s arrival in Formula 1 is finally on the horizon for 2026. But it won’t be its first foray into grand prix racing, as the German manufacturer giant has a history both long and enthralling

Formula 1
Sep 23, 2022
The seven factors powering Verstappen's 2022 F1 domination Plus

The seven factors powering Verstappen's 2022 F1 domination

After a tooth and nail and, at times, toxic Formula 1 world championship scrap last year, Max Verstappen's march to a second consecutive title has been the exact opposite. But has he really changed in 2022? Here's a dive into what factors have played a crucial role, both inside the Verstappen camp and elsewhere, in the Dutch driver's domination

Formula 1
Sep 23, 2022
Why Hamilton is still the man to keep driving Mercedes forward Plus

Why Hamilton is still the man to keep driving Mercedes forward

Lewis Hamilton’s words in a recent Vanity Fair interview define both his world-view and his approach to this season: one of perpetual struggle against adversity. As GP RACING explains, that’s what Lewis feeds off – and why, far from being down and nearly out, he’s using his unique skillset to spearhead Mercedes’ revival…

Formula 1
Sep 22, 2022
The time lag of ideas that offers intrigue over F1's future fight Plus

The time lag of ideas that offers intrigue over F1's future fight

The pecking order in 2022's Formula 1 season may look pretty static as the season draws to a close, but the unique nature of the cost cap means that preparation for next season takes precedence. New developments are being pushed back to 2023 - which could mask the technical development war ongoing...

Formula 1
Sep 22, 2022