F1 Azerbaijan GP: Verstappen leads Red Bull 1-2 as Ferrari suffers double DNF

Max Verstappen led a bruising Red Bull 1-2 to win Formula 1’s 2022 Azerbaijan Grand Prix once Ferrari had endured a disaster as polesitter Charles Leclerc and Carlos Sainz retired.

F1 Azerbaijan GP: Verstappen leads Red Bull 1-2 as Ferrari suffers double DNF

The defending champion stretched his standings lead from nine to 34 points over Leclerc - who had started from his sixth pole position of the season - as he bagged his fourth victory in five races over team-mate Sergio Perez by 20.8s.

Verstappen's 25th F1 triumph arrived after passing early leader Perez for the provisional lead, with Leclerc out-of-sync due to pitting in response to a VSC before his engine blew shockingly.

With Sainz also eliminated as part of an extreme attrition rate for Ferrari-powered cars, the way was paved for Verstappen to win as George Russell completed the podium.

Most of the grid assembled with brand-new medium compound C4 tyres, bar Sebastian Vettel and Kevin Magnussen (used tyres) plus Daniel Ricciardo, Valtteri Bottas and the back row of Lance Stroll and Mick Schumacher who were all shod on the C3 hard rubber.

Perez was encouraged over radio to get his “elbows out into Turn 1” and duly delivered.

Leclerc’s initially getaway was sound enough but wheelspin in the second phase allowed Perez to draw alongside at Verstappen was boxed in after the best launch of the lot.

The Ferrari driver then considerably locked-up his front-left into the opening 90-degree left-hander to run well wide of the apex and ensure Perez took the lead of the race.

Charles Leclerc, Ferrari F1-75, Sergio Perez, Red Bull Racing RB18, battle for the lead ahead of Max Verstappen, Red Bull Racing RB18, Carlos Sainz, Ferrari F1-75, the rest of the field at the start

Charles Leclerc, Ferrari F1-75, Sergio Perez, Red Bull Racing RB18, battle for the lead ahead of Max Verstappen, Red Bull Racing RB18, Carlos Sainz, Ferrari F1-75, the rest of the field at the start

Photo by: Mark Sutton / Motorsport Images

Verstappen was able to have a look up the inside of Leclerc but thought better of it as Sainz tried to get in on the act before dropping adrift of the leading three cars.

Perez completed the first lap with 1.3s in hand over Leclerc to immediately escape the DRS zone and extended that by half a second over the next two tours to cement first place.

With Leclerc sliding around, Verstappen was able to stick within 0.7s of his title rival.

Leclerc endured a wiggle out of Turn 16, the last defined corner, to allow Verstappen to close even further with DRS before a yellow flag then virtual safety car interrupted play.

The Ferrari attack was down to one car when Carlos Sainz ran down the Turn 4 escape road with a possible power unit failure while 5s behind Verstappen and 5s ahead of Russell.

Ferrari rolled the dice to gain a theoretically cheaper pitstop by calling Leclerc in for a set of hard tyres on lap 10 but despite no obvious error, the Scuderia took 5.4s to service Leclerc.

Red Bull did not cover the strategy, giving Perez a lead of 2s over Verstappen as Leclerc resumed 11s behind the pair - but from lap 13 began setting the fastest laps of the race.

Max Verstappen, Red Bull Racing RB18, Carlos Sainz, Ferrari F1-75, George Russell, Mercedes W13, the remainder of the field at the start

Max Verstappen, Red Bull Racing RB18, Carlos Sainz, Ferrari F1-75, George Russell, Mercedes W13, the remainder of the field at the start

Photo by: Sam Bloxham / Motorsport Images

Verstappen was able to eat into Perez’s advantage before the Mexican, who dropped 2s on one lap, was told “no fighting” to allow his DRS-assisted team-mate to take the lead on lap 15 into Turn 1.

At the end of the following tour, Perez pitted for softs but like front-row rival Leclerc, was hampered by a massively slow 5.7s stop led by a problem with the front-right wheel.

Red Bull called Verstappen in for his jump to hards only two laps later, and he too endured a subpar 3.5s service to rejoin in the lead with a 13s deficit to Leclerc – managing overheating rear tyres - as Perez nicked fastest lap from the Ferrari while running 4s behind Verstappen.

But too hot tyres were the least of Leclerc’s troubles soon after as at the end of lap 20, his engine blew up through the final and he coasted into the pitlane to end Ferrari’s disaster.

After the MGU-H turbo failure in Spain, it marked the second engine-based retirement for Leclerc in three races to add to the lost Ferrari 1-2 - from strategy blunders - in Monaco.

That left Verstappen in the lead by 5.2s over Perez as fifth-starting Russell moved into podium contention ahead of Ricciardo, Pierre Gasly and Lewis Hamilton.

Verstappen would negotiate target lap times with his engineer as they tried to find a balance between preserving the car but not allowing the tyres to cool too much.

Charles Leclerc, Ferrari F1-75

Charles Leclerc, Ferrari F1-75

Photo by: Glenn Dunbar / Motorsport Images

Then the virtual safety car made its second appearance to account for 16th-starting Kevin Magnussen, who had been climbed up to 11th to battle with Ocon for points.

But then the Ferrari engine in the back of the Haas also blew, to go along with Ferrari customer Alfa Romeo having to stop Zhou Guanyu eight laps previously.

Magnussen parked up on the approach to Turn 15 and waved to the marshals to help recover the Haas VF-22, which started to roll down the hill to the apex.

Red Bull reacted by pitting Verstappen for a second time to take on a set of hard tyres to the flag, finally nailing a 2.7s stop, before Perez made his stop for hards on the same lap 34.

But a rear-left delay meant more time was lost in the pitlane thanks to a 4.4s stop, to give Verstappen a lead of 10s when the four-minute VSC interluded was over.

Although it was Perez that would walk away with the fastest lap of the evening, Verstappen’s second half race pace stretched gap to north of 20s at the flag.

Russell strapped in for a lonely race but profited from the Ferrari nightmare to seal a podium despite a troubled weekend for the porpoising and draggy Mercedes W13.

Carlos Sainz, Ferrari F1-75, George Russell, Mercedes W13

Carlos Sainz, Ferrari F1-75, George Russell, Mercedes W13

Photo by: Carl Bingham / Motorsport Images

Despite back pain, Lewis Hamilton climbed to fourth thanks to a spirited drive with notable overtakes on the one-stopping trio of Ricciardo, Yuki Tsunoda and Pierre Gasly.

Gasly did manage his hard tyres for the long-haul, sealing fifth as a racy Sebastian Vettel recovered strongly from an early error to climb to sixth place.

Despite starting on a used set of mediums, Vettel had been fighting with Hamilton for seventh before pitting for hards to then chase after Ocon.

The Aston Martin passed the Alpine for ninth place on lap 13 before locking up at Turn 3 to abort the corner and spin in the escape road, narrowly missing Tsunoda when resuming in 12th.

Fernando Alonso was another strong climber, sealing seventh for Alpine as Ricciardo just managed to keep 8th over Lando Norris by just three tenths, the McLaren pair having each had to make their case for track position in the opening and final phase of the race as they ran on split strategies.

Ocon’s long opening stint on the hards returned the final point as Valtteri Bottas in 11th marked the highest finish for a Ferrari-powered car.

Alex Albon climbed to 12th ahead of Tsunoda, who had to pit for some tape to his rear wing after his DRS flap split in half. Schumacher crossed the line in 14th.

Latifi’s afternoon was spoiled before it had really begun for the Williams driver was handed a 10s stop-go penalty when a team mechanic rolled his car back, illegally touching the car.

He was then handed a further 5s penalty for failing to comply with blue flags.

Stroll joined Magnussen, Zhou and the two Ferraris as retirees.

Results:

Cla Driver Chassis Gap Interval
1 Netherlands Max Verstappen Red Bull    
2 Mexico Sergio Perez Red Bull 20.823 20.823
3 United Kingdom George Russell Mercedes 45.995 25.172
4 United Kingdom Lewis Hamilton Mercedes 1'11.679 25.684
5 France Pierre Gasly AlphaTauri 1'17.299 5.620
6 Germany Sebastian Vettel Aston Martin 1'24.099 6.800
7 Spain Fernando Alonso Alpine 1'28.596 4.497
8 Australia Daniel Ricciardo McLaren 1'32.207 3.611
9 United Kingdom Lando Norris McLaren 1'32.556 0.349
10 France Esteban Ocon Alpine 1'48.184 15.628
11 Finland Valtteri Bottas Alfa Romeo    
12 Thailand Alex Albon Williams    
13 Japan Yuki Tsunoda AlphaTauri    
14 Germany Mick Schumacher Haas    
15 Canada Nicholas Latifi Williams    
16 Canada Lance Stroll Aston Martin    
  Denmark Kevin Magnussen Haas    
  China Zhou Guanyu Alfa Romeo    
  Monaco Charles Leclerc Ferrari    
  Spain Carlos Sainz Ferrari    
shares
comments
Leclerc baffled by Ferrari’s F1 reliability woes after Baku DNF
Previous article

Leclerc baffled by Ferrari’s F1 reliability woes after Baku DNF

Next article

F1 Grand Prix race results: Verstappen wins Azerbaijan GP

F1 Grand Prix race results: Verstappen wins Azerbaijan GP
Who were the fastest drivers in F1 2022? Plus

Who were the fastest drivers in F1 2022?

Who was the fastest driver in 2022? Everyone has an opinion, but what does the stopwatch say? Obviously, differing car performance has an effect on ultimate laptime – but it’s the relative speed of each car/driver package that’s fascinating and enlightening says ALEX KALINAUCKAS

Why F1's nearly man is refreshed and ready for his return Plus

Why F1's nearly man is refreshed and ready for his return

He has more starts without a podium than anyone else in Formula 1 world championship history, but Nico Hulkenberg is back for one more shot with Haas. After spending three years on the sidelines, the revitalised German is aiming to prove to his new team what the F1 grid has been missing

Formula 1
Jan 29, 2023
The potential-laden F1 car that Ferrari neglected Plus

The potential-laden F1 car that Ferrari neglected

The late Mauro Forghieri played a key role in Ferrari’s mid-1960s turnaround, says STUART CODLING, and his pretty, intricate 1512 was among the most evocative cars of the 1.5-litre era. But a victim of priorities as Formula 1 was deemed less lucrative than success in sportscars, its true potential was never seen in period

Formula 1
Jan 28, 2023
Why Vasseur relishes 'feeling the pressure' as Ferrari's F1 boss Plus

Why Vasseur relishes 'feeling the pressure' as Ferrari's F1 boss

OPINION: Fred Vasseur has spent only a few weeks as team principal for the Ferrari Formula 1 team, but is already intent on taking the Scuderia back to the very top. And despite it being arguably the most demanding job in motorsport, the Frenchman is relishing the challenge

Formula 1
Jan 27, 2023
The crucial tech changes F1 teams must adapt to in 2023 Plus

The crucial tech changes F1 teams must adapt to in 2023

Changes to the regulations for season two of Formula 1's ground-effects era aim to smooth out last year’s troubles and shut down loopholes. But what areas have been targeted, and what impact will this have?

Formula 1
Jan 26, 2023
Are these the 50 quickest drivers in F1 history? Plus

Are these the 50 quickest drivers in F1 history?

Who are the quickest drivers in Formula 1 history? LUKE SMITH asked a jury of experienced and international panel of experts and F1 insiders. Some of them have worked closely with F1’s fastest-ever drivers – so who better to vote on our all-time top 50? We’re talking all-out speed here rather than size of trophy cabinet, so the results may surprise you…

Formula 1
Jan 25, 2023
One easy way the FIA could instantly improve F1 Plus

One easy way the FIA could instantly improve F1

OPINION: During what is traditionally a very quiet time of year in the Formula 1 news cycle, FIA president Mohammed Ben Sulayem has been generating headlines. He’s been commenting on massive topics in a championship that loves them, but also addressing necessary smaller changes too. Here we suggest a further refinement that would be a big boon to fans

Formula 1
Jan 24, 2023
How can McLaren keep hold of Norris? Plus

How can McLaren keep hold of Norris?

Lando Norris is no longer the young cheeky-chappy at McLaren; he’s now the established ace. And F1's big guns will come calling if the team can’t give him a competitive car. Here's what the team needs to do to retain its prize asset

Formula 1
Jan 24, 2023