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Formula 1 Canadian GP

F1 2024 schedule: When is the next Formula 1 race?

The 2024 Formula 1 season has a record-breaking 24 races, following the return of the Chinese Grand Prix.

Fernando Alonso, Aston Martin AMR24, Oscar Piastri, McLaren MCL38, Lewis Hamilton, Mercedes F1 W15, Charles Leclerc, Ferrari SF-24, George Russell, Mercedes F1 W15, Valtteri Bottas, Kick Sauber C44, at the restart

Photo by: Sam Bloxham / Motorsport Images

The FIA has regionalised some of the F1 calendar in an attempt to make the series more sustainable. This included moving the Japanese Grand Prix from its mid-to-late-season spot to April for a more defined Asian leg, with the return of the Chinese Grand Prix following two weeks later. 

The Qatar Grand Prix was also moved to become the penultimate race on the calendar, to make it easier to transport cars and equipment to the Abu Dhabi finale. This should also help combat the extreme heat issues that were faced by the drivers in 2023 during the race at the Losail International Circuit, as it is expected to be cooler at the start of December. 

When is the next Formula 1 race?

Round 9 of the 2024 Formula 1 season is the Canadian Grand Prix. The event is held on the Circuit Gilles Villeneuve on Notre Dame Island in Montreal. 

The Canadian Grand Prix will take place between 7-9 June, with Sunday’s race starting at 7pm BST – 2pm local time.  

The race has been held 58 times since 1961, with Canada’s own Peter Ryan in the Lotus winning the inaugural grand prix. The event was initially held at the Mosport Park in Ontario between 1961 and 1978, alternating with the Circuit Mont-Tremblant in Quebec in 1968 and 1970.  

Lando Norris, McLaren MCL60

Lando Norris, McLaren MCL60

Photo by: Patrick Vinet / Motorsport Images

The Canadian GP moved to the Circuit Ile Notre-Dame in 1978 (renamed the Circuit Gilles Villeneuve in 1982 in honour of the Canadian driver) due to safety concerns around the other two tracks, with Gilles Villeneuve taking home the win in his home race. Michael Schumacher has taken home the most wins at the event, with seven podiums between 1994-2004.  

The 2011 Canadian Grand Prix holds the record for the longest race in F1 history, after Jenson Button crossed the finish line in four hours and five minutes, which included a red flag period.  

What are the timings for the Canadian Grand Prix?

Here are the full UK timings for the Canadian Grand Prix: 

Friday 7 June:  

  • FP1 – 6.30pm 
  • FP2 – 10pm 

Saturday 8 June:  

  • FP3 – 5.30pm 
  • Qualifying - 9pm 

Sunday 9 June: 

  • Race - 7pm 

Where is the Canadian Grand Prix being held?

The Canadian Grand Prix will take place at the Circuit Gilles Villeneuve in Montreal. The event moved to the 4.361 km circuit in 1978 and was named after the Canadian F1 driver Gilles Villeneuve, who died in 1982.  

One of the most notable parts of the Circuit Gilles Villeneuve is the Wall of Champions, which is the final corner on the track. It is known for crashes that involve former world champions, including famously in 1999 when Michael Schumacher, Damon Hill and Jacques Villeneuve all crashed into the same wall. 

Kevin Magnussen, Haas F1 Team VF-19, hits the Wall of Champions and crashes out towards the end of Q2

Kevin Magnussen, Haas F1 Team VF-19, hits the Wall of Champions and crashes out towards the end of Q2

Photo by: Simon Galloway / Motorsport Images

In more recent years, the Wall of Champions has seen crashes from Jenson Button and Sebastian Vettel, as well as former Formula Renault 3.5 champions Carlos Sainz and Kevin Magnussen. 

Valtteri Bottas set the lap record in 2019, when he set a time of 1:13.078 in his Mercedes W10. 

Remaining 2024 F1 schedule

Date 

Grand Prix 

FP1 (UK time) 

FP2 (UK time)  

FP3 (UK time) 

Qualifying (UK time) 

Race (UK time) 

7-9 June  

Canada  

6.30pm  

10pm  

5.30pm  

9pm  

7pm  

21-23 June  

Spain  

12.30pm  

4pm  

11.30am  

3pm   

2pm  

28-30 June  

Austria*   

11.30am 

3.30pm (Sprint Quali) 

11am (Sprint) 

3pm  

2pm  

5-7 July  

Great Britain  

12.30pm  

4pm  

11.30am  

3pm  

3pm  

19-21 July  

Hungary  

12.30pm  

4pm  

11.30am  

3pm   

2pm  

26-28 July  

Belgium  

12.30pm  

4pm  

11.30pm  

3pm   

2pm  

23-25 August  

Netherlands  

11.30am  

3pm  

10.30am  

2pm   

2pm  

30 August – 1 September  

Italy  

12.30pm  

4pm  

11.30am  

3pm   

2pm  

13-15 September  

Azerbaijan   

10.30am  

2pm  

9.30am  

1pm   

12pm  

20-22 September  

Singapore  

10.30am  

2pm  

10.30am  

2pm   

1pm  

18-20 October  

United States*  

6.30pm 

10.30pm (Sprint Quali) 

7pm (Sprint) 

  11pm 

8pm  

25-27 October  

Mexico  

7.30pm   

11pm  

6.30pm  

10pm   

8pm  

1-3 November  

Brazil*  

2.30pm 

6.30pm (Sprint Quali) 

2pm (Sprint) 

6pm 

5pm  

21-23 November  

Las Vegas  

2.30am 

6am 

2.30am 

6am 

6am  

29 November – 1 December  

Qatar*  

1.30pm 

5.30pm (Sprint Quali) 

1pm 

5pm 

5pm  

6-8 December  

Abu Dhabi  

9.30am  

1pm  

10.30am  

2pm   

1pm  

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