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Alpine "convinced" 2026 F1 chassis rules will negate any potential engine power losses

Alpine interim team boss Bruno Famin is “convinced” Formula 1’s 2026 rules overhaul will be a success because new chassis regulations can compensate for any potential engine power losses.

Oscar Piastri, McLaren MCL60, Pierre Gasly, Alpine A523, Kevin Magnussen, Haas VF-23, Fernando Alonso, Aston Martin AMR23, Nico Hulkenberg, Haas VF-23, Esteban Ocon, Alpine A523

Photo by: Mark Sutton / Motorsport Images

When the 2026-30 engine specification was being devised, both Audi and Porsche seemed ready to commit to the series. This increased the emphasis on sustainability and road relevancy.

The outcome was a 50:50 power split between internal combustion engine and electrical output.

But as initial simulator data was provided to teams, concerns were raised about drivers having to slow suddenly on straights and needing to downshift gears due to the extreme battery regeneration required, which lead to the 470bhp (350kW) of electric power dropping out.

Autosport understands that the FIA has no plans to change the equal power split now teams are already dyno testing their next-generation engines.

Famin - interim boss of the Alpine race team and engine programme - therefore reckons the success of F1’s next rule cycle depends on the chassis regulations, which are expected to radically cut drag and introduce active front and rear wings to help the cars perform in a straight line.

“I think we all share the concern,” said Famin when asked by Autosport about the pitfalls of relying too heavily on the electrified part of the hybrid powertrain.

“We are all working - Formula 1, the FIA, the teams, the PU manufacturers - to find the right final regulation for the cars.

“I think the energy management, we can still work on that in the coming months. There is no hurry.

Bruno Famin, Executive Director - Viry-Chatillon, Alpine F1 Team, Mike Krack, Team Principal, Aston Martin F1 Team, Alessandro Alunni Bravi, Team Representative, Alfa Romeo F1 Team, Christian Horner, Team Principal, Red Bull Racing, in the team princi

Photo by: Motorsport Images

Bruno Famin, Executive Director - Viry-Chatillon, Alpine F1 Team, Mike Krack, Team Principal, Aston Martin F1 Team, Alessandro Alunni Bravi, Team Representative, Alfa Romeo F1 Team, Christian Horner, Team Principal, Red Bull Racing, in the team princi

“What I have to say is that, now the PU technical regulation has been officialised quite a long time ago, one and a half year ago almost, all the PU manufacturers are working hard.

“They have made already very important choices in terms of the way we want to go, the technology we want to develop.

“Changing now won't be a good thing. It's not acceptable, clearly.

“But I'm convinced that we will find a way with the chassis technical regulation to make good cars, good sport.”

F1 chiefs hit back at teams’ complaints over their 2026 simulations, saying they were running with data that was months out of date compared to their own research.

The straight-line issues could also have come from teams simulating the new engines while still running with a current high-drag car model.

Due to the switch to a 50:50 power ratio, the maximum power from the internal combustion engine is expected to drop by 25% to around 500bhp. A move away from the current split turbocharger layout is also expected to significantly increase turbo lag.

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