2019 Formula 1 calendar and rules tweaks approved by FIA's WMSC

Formula 1's 2019 calendar and a host of technical and sporting rule changes were formally approved by the FIA's World Motor Sport Council on Friday

2019 Formula 1 calendar and rules tweaks approved by FIA's WMSC

Following the WMSC meeting in Paris, no changes have been made to the 21-round 2019 schedule from the draft version that was released by F1's owner Liberty Media back in August.

The season will start in Australia on March 17, and finish with the Abu Dhabi Grand Prix on December 1.

Following approval by F1's Strategy Group and the F1 Commission, the new rules, revealed previously by Autosport, include a new position for rear-view mirrors and rear wings to help with rearward visibility.

The location of onboard cameras will be changed to compensate for problems caused by the introduction of the halo this year. Lights will also be added to rear-wing endplates, while minor modifications will be made to the halo fairing to help with driver extraction.

Among other sporting rules changes, drivers will now only be allowed to overtake after a safety-car period once they have crossed "a consistent point", according to an FIA statement.

Previously they had been allowed to do so at a safety car line.

Teams will also be made responsible for the initial scrutineering of their cars and must declare their cars comply with all safety related matters.

The use of a chequered light panel at the end of the race, alongside the traditional flag, has been approved, while for 2020, the team personnel curfew will increase from eight to nine hours.

The WMSC also noted a report on security procedures to be put in place for next year's Brazilian Grand Prix "was presented to the Council, following meetings between the FIA, Formula 1 and the local authorities".

The race promoter was issued with a series of security recommendations in December last year, after a series of problems surrounding the 2017 grand prix.

2019 F1 calendar

March 17 Australian Grand Prix (Melbourne)
March 31 Bahrain Grand Prix (Sakhir)
April 14 Chinese Grand Prix (Shanghai)
April 28 Azerbaijan Grand Prix (Baku)
May 12 Spanish Grand Prix (Barcelona)
May 26 Monaco Grand Prix (Monte Carlo)
June 9 Canadian Grand Prix (Montreal)
June 23 French Grand Prix (Paul Ricard)
June 30 Austrian Grand Prix (Red Bull Ring)
July 14 British Grand Prix (Silverstone)
July 28 German Grand Prix (Hockenheim)
August 4 Hungarian Grand Prix (Budapest)
September 1 Belgian Grand Prix (Spa)
September 8 Italian Grand Prix (Monza)
September 22 Singapore Grand Prix (Marina Bay)
September 29 Russian Grand Prix (Sochi)
October 13 Japanese Grand Prix (Suzuka)
October 27 Mexican Grand Prix (Mexico City)
November 3 United States Grand Prix (Austin)
November 17 Brazilian Grand Prix (Interlagos)
December 1 Abu Dhabi Grand Prix (Yas Marina)

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